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At risk of pulling a Jimski here (this thread is looooong tinmad!),
here's my two cents:

In college I used to ski like a total TGR forum RBP-gnigguhc broe-hah,
always trying to cut down oak trees with my edges and what-not. I
skied a single pair of Fritschi Freerides (the black ones) almost
exclusively. I only damaged them lightly three times and once
seriously (LOLZ!), and Black Diamond sent me new parts every time, no
questions asked. That may sound bad, but I've been pretty impressed
with their sturdiness overall. I still have them and they work great.
I would recommend them to anyone looking for that all around
"inbounds/backcountry" setup.

(On the other hand, don't buy a pair of Onyx's and try going from fast
to zero on a giant water bar. On the upside, G3 hooked me up on the
warranty, too.)

Moral of the story: Fritschis are great all-rounders; don't smash into
a water bar on any setup; gear companies have great warranties.

- BW


On Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 9:16 AM, Get Skied <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> On Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 10:13 PM, roger Klinger <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>>
>> On Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 11:36 AM, Get Skied <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> I think Matt Duffy brings up two good points here which are worthy of
>>> further discussion.
>>
>> snip
>>>
>>>
>>> 2) Weight is an obvious factor, however dropping the weight of one's
>>> setup becomes a zero sum game at some point for most skiers. Consider the
>>> main benefits of a lighter weight setup:
>>
>>
>> Well said on all points, but you missed point D)(which may only be true
>> for me but I doubt it) It is simply more enjoyable to climb and descend
>> with less weight than typical alpine gear.  There's a reason most hikers
>> went away from heavy leather shoes for most hikes, and the same reasoning
>> goes for ski boots.
>
>
> I agree with this point. Was pretty much just simplifying it to play devil's
> advocate, but yes a lightweight setup will almost always be more comfortable
> to ascend on than a heavyweight setup, barring fit issues.
>
> BTW, I should also clarify that I have had pre-release issues on Fritschis,
> alpine bindings, and in rare cases on tech bindings, but in those rare cases
> there was an obvious explanation (snow buildup in the toe piece). If I had
> Fritschis today I'd probably treat them better to avoid material fatigue and
> slop.
>
> Evan
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