Sure. What's the worst that you can do? Screw it up and then take it to the shop. Remember:

1) You care more about your skis than any shop will.
2) Cut twice, then measure once.


On Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 4:19 AM, John Bonin <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
This is great.  Thanks.
Would you recommend trying this for the first time on a pair of skis that you care about?

"Experience is something that you get, just after you need it."


On Fri, Jan 17, 2014 at 11:08 PM, Brian M. Waters <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Seems relevant about now.

1. Ski over a rock.
2. If the gouge is all the way into the laminate, or if the base is
sufficiently damaged, consider removing a chunk of it with an exacto
knife.
3. Next, you should do some surface prep. I don't know how commonly
anyone really does this on skis, but it's very important any time
you're doing any kind of bonding, ever.
    a) Clean the area with acetone or a similar solvent.
    b) Scuff it up a bit with some sandpaper. (Maybe ~120 grit.)
    c) Clean the dust out with another swipe of your favorite solvent.
    d) Don't touch it with your grimy paws or let it sit out too long
before going to the next step.
4. Grab some Metalgrip (for core shots) or P-Tex (for scratches) from
a site like tognar.com. If you want to do it right, don't bother with
drip candles.
5. Get your hands on either a soldering iron with a nice fat tip, or a
regular ironing iron that can be turned up really high. (I haven't
tried, but I don't think a ski waxing iron will get hot enough to melt
P-Tex.) Make sure you get all the wax off if you're using an iron.
6. Take a chunk of metalgrip or P-Tex, put it down on top of the
repair, and squash that sucker down flat with your iron. Make sure it
gets real nice and melty hot, like the delicious melty chocolate on a
Waffle Haus treat, but also be careful not to damage your bases.
7. Let it cool. Make sure it cools aaaaaall the way down to room
temperature before you finish the repair. If you don't, you might rip
it out.
8. Take some higher-grit sandpaper (I think I used 600 last time) and
get rid if the excess gunk. A sanding block will help you keep your
base flat. Here's where I may differ with a lot of other folks who are
concerned with messing up their base pattern. Some people like to use
a steel scraper, but don't try thus until you get it pretty nice and
flat first, because you can rip the repair right out.
9. Ski over a rock.
10. Go back to step 1.

- BW

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