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Re: Stumpers. (1) Who has expertise in identifying insect bites and
stings?... (2) Who has expertise in treating insect bites and stings?...



> Any others?...
>
> So far, we got...
>
> allergist, allergy specialist
> dermatologist
> infectious disease specialists
> immunologist
>
> disaster medicine specialist
> wilderness medicine specialist
>
> family practice MDs
> patient's parents' home remedies
> nurse practitioners
> paramedics
>
> critical care specialist
> emergency care clinicians
> emergency medicine physicians, emergency physicians

ER docs Emergency Room docs
>
> corporation health clinicians as appropriate

hospitalists

school and summer camp nurses

university health clinicians
>
> forensic pathologists
> medical examiner
> plastic surgery MDs
> D.V.M Veterinary Medicine Doctor
>
> entomologist

Local naturalist

Parasitologists
> Tropical medicine
> urban entomologist


> __________     ______________________
> allergist, allergy specialist
> corporation health clinicians as appropriate

critical care specialist

dermatologist
>
> disaster medicine specialist
> emergency care clinicians
> emergency medicine physicians, emergency physicians

entomologist
>
> ER docs Emergency Room docs
> family practice MDs
> forensic pathologists
> hospitalists
>
> infectious disease specialists
> immunologist

Local naturalist
> medical examiner


> nurse practitioners
>
paramedics

Parasitologists

patient's parents' home remedies


> plastic surgery MDs
> school and summer camp nurses

Tropical medicine
> university health clinicians


> urban entomologist
> D.V.M Veterinary Medicine Doctor
> wilderness medicine specialist
>


Many thanks to all !


On Thu, Aug 14, 2014 at 12:44 PM, Iserson, Kenneth V - (kvi) <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hi Don
>
>         I've seen that you have kept this question going, although, as I
> pointed out, it is an incomplete (and inaccurate) question. And,
> apparently, folks respond to it without reading other responses. Most
> disquieting to me is that medical librarians seem to be responding to this
> question without apparently thinking through the question or researching it.
>
>         Ken
> Kenneth V. Iserson, M.D., MBA, FACEP, FAAEM
> Fellow, International Federation of Emergency Med
> Professor Emeritus, The University of Arizona
> Director: www.reeme.arizona.edu Project
> 4930 N. Calle Faja, Tucson, AZ 85718
> (520) 241-7744; [log in to unmask]
> Blog: KenIserson.Tumblr.com
> Facebook.com/KenIserson
> www.galenpress.com




On Thu, Aug 14, 2014 at 10:44 AM, Iserson, Kenneth V - (kvi) <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hi Don:
>
>         You seem to actually be asking two questions: (1) Who has
> expertise in identifying insect bites and stings? and (2) Who has expertise
> in treating insect bites and stings?
> The answer to the first question is that, unless they see the insect
> biting, find a residual stinger (e.g., bee), or the patient presents with a
> disease known only to be transmitted by a single type of insect (e.g.,
> malaria, Lyme disease), no one can make a definitive diagnosis. Skin reacts
> to insect bites and stings in only a limited number of ways, so these
> lesions look alike—and may not even be caused by insects.
>
>         As for treating them, a wide variety of clinicians have expertise
> in treating them. The first “clinician” is the patient’s mother, who has
> lots of homegrown remedies for common, simple stings. Many work fine. But,
> most importantly, most do no harm. Clinicians trained in emergency care
> (e.g., paramedics, Emergency Physicians) can treat anaphylaxis, the most
> common life-threatening complication. If the bite/sting becomes infected or
> necrotic, a wide variety of clinicians can treat it. If it progresses to
> sepsis (rare), then you may be talking about Critical Care specialists.
>
> Hope this helps. Ken
>
> Kenneth V. Iserson, M.D., MBA, FACEP, FAAEM
> Fellow, International Federation of Emergency Med
> Professor Emeritus, The University of Arizona
> Author: "The Global Healthcare Volunteer's Handbook: What You Need to Know
> Before You Go" (2014;Galen Press, Ltd.)
>


From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> On Behalf Of Adam Moore
> Sent: Thursday, August 14, 2014 8:43 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: -Stumpers. Besides a dermatologist or entomologist,
>
> Suggest you share your end result with the list for its utility in primary
> care!
> I'd include MDs in family practice and plastic surgery, hospitalists; also
> those staffing health clinics of universities, and corporations' ones as
> appropriate. Nurse practitioners, school and summer camp type nurses should
> certainly also be on any list.
> A super question !
>
> -Adam Moore MD
> Exeter, New Hampshire
>



> From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> On Behalf Of don warner saklad
> Sent: Thursday, August 14, 2014 1:48 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: -Stumpers. Besides a dermatologist or entomologist, a) any other
> kinds of M.D.?... or b) what other specialists?... have expertise about
> insect bites?...
>
> medlib-l stumpers
>
> Besides a dermatologist or entomologist, a) any other kinds of M.D.?... or
> b) what other specialists?... particularly clinicians have expertise about
> identifying insect bites on humans from the bite whether or not a specimen
> of the insect is available?
>
>    oo__ Don Warner Saklad
>
>             Guide to Problematical Library Use
>             Boston Area Library Users Group
>             [log in to unmask]
>