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We're in the process of reviewing our journal subscriptions for renewal.
In the last two weeks, I've fielded requests from several departments to
add some new titles that we don't already have.  One costs $4500 a year,
another costs $3000, and another one came in at $1700.  All are very
specialized journals that are unlikely to be used by anyone outside that
department.  With almost all our current holdings coming in bundles,
there's no way to cut low-use titles to fund these requests.  I got a stern
lecture from one person who said it seemed like we ought to be supporting
his new research lab's work (and of course, I would like to!), and that we
should just "find" the money somewhere.   How do you resolve this kind of
stalemate?  I DO want the libraries to be the main go-to source for
journals, and I DO want to support our service lines.  I study usage stats,
do my best to tweak and fit and serve the greatest number of people I can,
but at some point my budget is done and I can't just suddenly "find" $7000
to please two new researchers.  And the publishers make it torturous to
tailor your holdings because they package everything with "no
substitutions."  I am very lucky to have a generous budget, and going to
ask for more would raise eyebrows I don't want raised.

Suggestions?  Approaches?  I'm thinking of having an informal chat with our
VP of Medical Affairs, and see what he might offer... like having the
medical staff resume an annual donation of funds to the collection budget
or something...  Anyway, would like to hear how you all handle / explain
these awkward situations.

-- 
Julie Stielstra, MLS
Manager, Libraries of Cadence Health
Central DuPage Hospital
25 N Winfield Rd
Winfield, IL 60190
phone 630-933-4536
fax     630-933-4530
email jstielstra [ at ]  gmail.com

"Never...be mean in anything; never be false; never be cruel. Avoid those
three vices...and I can always be hopeful of you."  -- Betsy Trotwood to
David Copperfield (Charles Dickens)