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Hardware durability is crucial. So is usability.

Personally, I much prefer a fully functional laptop for kids within and outside school... that is functional creatively. Schools that encourage that creative use outside school walls go much further. I've seen and visited schools who so severely 'institutionalize' a powerful laptop that it is basically unintuitive, and only functional as a basic app and web research tool. The school philosophy around the usage of the device is paramount.

On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 11:21 AM, Matt Henchen <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Agreed.  And I would argue that too often the discussion is about "what we do at school" as if that is the only place students develop skills and knowledge. So I supposed the discussion is what is that thing, that device, that ALL students will have access to. 

On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 11:15 AM, Joanne Finnegan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Too often the discussion is around devices, not learning. I still advocate that there is a need for a variety of devices for students whether the environment is 1:1 or not. For example, an elementary school with only Chromebooks is doing a disservice to kids if there are no tablets available for creating movies, using whiteboard apps for explaining concepts, etc. Yes, you can do all that with a Chromebook, but it takes much more time away from the actual learning (i.e., content) to do what is simple and fast on a mobile device/iPad/tablet.

Joanne

On Fri, Dec 12, 2014 at 11:03 AM, Raymond Ballou <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Mike

Brendan beat me to the car analogy, so I will just add.

There is a lot of 'what business uses' or 'most popular this or that' postulation in Ed Tech.

If that applied in the Driver Ed world, our 'car' would be a Ford F150.


For 1-1, expectations benefit from being device agnostic, as none of us know how things will unfold ...


I echo what others have said re:

CART                        =>  HORSE
what do we want to do => what are our device options


R

I don’t think you can fairly compare the most expensive solution to the least expensive solution. 

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Joanne Finnegan
Semi-retired Technology Integrationist
Former math and computer programming teacher
42 years in education and still love to learn!

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Adam A. Provost, MAT
Technology Integration - Partnership for Change Initiative 
Burlington High School, Vermont

Personal Blog: creativeStir.blogspot.com

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