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Hi Brian,

There was a recent discussion on some complications in dealing with
nitrates that you might want to look at for good measure (search the
archives for the latest subject heading IAEA-N-3).

I can't imagine dicyandiamide posing problems provided enough O2, but is
there any reason to measure the K3PO4 for C/N? Or are you looking at the
oxygen isotopes of the PO4?

Good luck,
Robert

Robert J. Panetta, Ph.D.
R&D Manager
Isoprime, Ltd.

On Friday, March 20, 2015, Brian Hayden <[log in to unmask]
<javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml',[log in to unmask]);>> wrote:

>   Hi all,
>
>  We are analysing samples (C and N of fish and invertebrates) from a
> controlled study where NaNO3, Kh2PO4 and dicyandiamide (C2H2N4) were added
> as different treatments. We are thinking of analysing the actual chemicals
> added to the systems to get ‘baseline’ values for each treatment. We
> haven’t run these in the past and would like to hear from someone who has
> before subjecting our instruments to weird and unusal chemicals. If anyone
> has experience analyzing these chemicals or can think of any potential
> issues when doing so please let me know.
>
>  Best,
>
>  Brian
>
>
>   *Dr. Brian Hayden*
>
>
>
> *Science Manager*
>
> Stable Isotope in Nature Laboratory (SINLAB
> <http://www.unb.ca/research/institutes/cri/sinlab/>)
>
>
>  Canadian Rivers Institute
>
> Department of Biology
>
> University of New Brunswick
>
> Fredericton, NB
>
> E3B 5A3, Canada
>
>
>
> Tel: +1 (506) 451-6892
>
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>
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>

-- 
Robert