My personal experience, derping around on the Coolidge Range ridgeline, is that the LT frequently becomes impossible to locate in winter, once the snowpack becomes deep enough to hide all trace of the trail and with blobs of snow on the sides of trees that look like white blazes, but aren't.

I'd think any crew that is not completely familiar with the route would have to expect to get lost repeatedly, say, half a dozen times on a 45-mile stretch, esp. considering the plan to go so long in the dark with no sleep. I find it hard to see the target 36-hour completion time estimate as particularly realistic, and my understanding is that last year's first trial hike, indeed, went a lot slower than expected.

On 1/12/2016 8:39 AM, Benjamin Bloom wrote:
[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
I think what Roger means is that while the LT feels remote, you're never more than about an hour from a road. If you pop out on a road, you may be "lost" but you're not really in danger.  

I'm not sure I agree.  In the winter, when you can't see ground vegetation and boot-worn paths, it can be easy to think you're on a trail when you're not.  White blazes on white snow can make things difficult.  Trail familiarity comes into play when you're traveling portions of the LT like from the Winooski to Mansfield, which has a reputation for being difficult with few sources of water. 

If the goal is to make a small team of people work together and not get "lost" in the woods on their own, give them a beacon of some sort so that the event organizers can always locate them. 



Benjamin D. Bloom
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On Mon, Jan 11, 2016 at 10:50 PM, telenaut <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
This is incomprehensible to me.
If you make a wrong turn and it takes an hour to find out, what on earth makes it hard to get lost?
I must be missing something.
--tn

Roger Klinger wrote on 1/11/16, 10:43 PM:


On Mon, Jan 11, 2016 at 9:08 PM, Nathan Bryant <[log in to unmask]" target="_blank">[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>The goal is to do 45 miles in about 36 hours, with most people unfamiliar with the route.

What's to be familiar with?  It's  a straight line.  If you  take the wrong turn at an intersection, you're at a road in an hour. How does one possibly get lost?



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