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Great online resource for curricula, lesson enhancements, and professional development.  Many are annotated with the standards they meet.

Best,
Pat
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Patrick J. Clemins
Cyber Specialist, Vermont EPSCoR
Asst Research Professor, Dept of Computer Science, University of Vermont
23 Mansfield Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405-0215
Phone: (802) 448-2188 • Fax: (802) 656-2950
Email: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
Website: www.uvm.edu/EPSCoR<http://www.uvm.edu/EPSCoR>

From: Chuck Pizer [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 10:00 AM
To: Patrick J Clemins <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Free Educational Resources

[Vermont PBS]          &   [PBS Learning Media]

A gateway to Free Online Resources for Vermont educators.


Dear Educator:

March is Women’s History Month, and Vermont PBS has some excellent resources for teachers and their students at all grade levels – resources related to Women’s history and much more.

Vermont PBS provides our schools and teachers with a FREE portal to PBS Learning Media, a rich media-on-demand resource that gives educators, parents and students completely free access to the best of public media. Explore over 100,000 research-based, classroom-ready digital learning experiences, aligned with National and Common Core State Standards. You'll find short clips, interactive activities, images, audio files, self-paced lessons and professional development resources. Sign-up is free and easy. Visit:  Vermont PBS Learning Media<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=8vnszGgdTAPl01zTvhZ57A>.

Additionally, if you’d like to learn more about upcoming programs and the educational resources we bring to your schools and communities, sign up for our weekly newsletter:  Vermont PBS Weekly<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=pheKd9Yess0AO8dxufTPXA>

Below you’ll find a sampling of resources – kindergarten through grade 12 – related to Women’s History Month and available at Vermont PBS Learning Media<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=d3oicq3NrOxwbvcLXypnGA>.

Grades K-5
Women’s History Month – All About the Holidays – 1 1/2 min. clip<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=puvYc24qVGioW2dxjmO5xg>
In this interview, civil-rights leader Diane Nash recalls her role in the 1960 Nashville sit-ins, the 1961 Freedom Rides and the 1965 voting rights campaign in Selma, Alabama. As one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Nash mobilized her fellow college students to confront segregation and discrimination with nonviolent direct action.

Grades 5-12
Women’s Movement Collection of resources<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=CEKYP3CBbkqtdp3qGf4qmw>

Grades 6-12
Diane Nash and the Sit-Ins, 5 min. clip<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=3oRn3yqXCpcjpdBLjhA_yg>

Grades 9-12
Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock – 15 minute clip<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=mHaZV4qf29Sv-7e1h52YJQ>
During the 1950s, the new medium of television brought the struggle for civil rights into the homes of Americans, broadcasting dramatic images of clashes between nonviolent protesters and violent segregationists. Acutely aware of the power media coverage had to shed light on the nature of racism in the South, many civil rights leaders attracted media attention by staging newsworthy marches, demonstrations, rallies, and boycotts. The film Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock is a presentation of Independent Lens.

Women Peacemakers: The Interrupters<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=NHhxT7x5w62TZJ9BBr7nWw>
In an effort to stop the cycle of retaliatory violence that plagues the streets of Chicago, former gang members and ex-convicts known as "violence interrupters" work with an organization called CeaseFire, using their street credibility to stop shootings before they happen.

Women’s Suffrage:  Crash Course<http://support.vermontpbs.org/site/R?i=uwkC46l0CeXSilqt_2BKTg>
John Green teaches about American women in the Progressive Era and the progress they made. Women gained the right to vote when the 19th amendment was passed and ratified. But women made a many other gains in the 30 years between 1890 and 1920.

Tell us what you think!
We’d love to get your feedback regarding Vermont PBS Learning Media. Let me know what you liked, what you didn’t and what you’d like to see in the future. Was it easy to find resources and topic areas? Were they easy to use?
Contact me directly and let me know what you thoughts: Chuck Pizer, Vermont PBS Community Engagement Director: [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]> or 802.654.3688.

Thanks to generous support from

[National Life Group]







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