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And by the way, this August whatever I have never seen in northern New England….


Alex

 

Alex Grkovich

BALA | TMP  

617 357 6060 ext. 329  |  [log in to unmask]

 

From: Vermont Butterfly Survey [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Alex Grkovich
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 10:36 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: 2 tiger swallowtails of Grand Isle, 17-July

 

Michael,

 

You are correct – compares favorably. They are either: A hybrid between glaucus and canadensis (but the date is wrong for that) – which a recent paper seems to be mainly suggesting, OR something to do with appalachiensis in north/central New England.

 

In Mass. (northeastern and north central MA at least), there is a flight of an “Appy” in June – AFTER the spring glaucus flight - (which we have referred to as the “New England Tiger”)  that is somewhat larger than the first flight of glaucus in late April / May (but smaller than Appy from the southern Appalachians), followed in early July by another “Appy” entity that can be as large as typical Appy, but with different females than the June entity. This “flight” is followed by what looks like a second flight of glaucus. After THAT, there is yet again something else that is not glaucus, but probably can’t be Appy either because Appy in its typical range has only one apparent flight (late May through June).

 

Alex

 

Alex Grkovich

BALA | TMP  

617 357 6060 ext. 329  |  [log in to unmask]

 

From: Vermont Butterfly Survey [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michael Newton
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 10:12 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: 2 tiger swallowtails of Grand Isle, 17-July

 

How do these images from July 3rd in New London, NH compare?

 

https://flic.kr/p/JLsXA2

https://flic.kr/p/HQiMkJ

https://flic.kr/p/JHDeqT

 

It seemed too small for Appalachian, and too late for Canadian ... and couldn't have been around for more than a day or two.

 

Based on the wear on Dave's photos, perhaps they emerged around the same time?

 

Michael Newton

Ashland, MA

 

On Mon, Jul 18, 2016 at 9:10 AM, Alex Grkovich <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Bryan,

This is what I wrote a little while ago on the subject of Tiger Swallowtails at Mount Washington, New Hampshire, on NE Leps:

>>>The name "canadensis" almost seems to be a garbage can into which to drop whatever "Tiger" one sees in the Canadian Zone around Mount Washington. One small female, fairly worn, has the submarginal light spots below almost separate, as in glaucus. She does not have the "look" of a typical canadensis. We missed  a similar perched almost fresh male, which was missing a part of its hindwing. We have previously found unusual Tigers up and down the Auto Road in the 1st half of July, some with curious concave FW margins as in rutulus, others small and more like a tiny "glaucus" or "glaucus X appalachiensis"....One at least that was taken up there at Pinkham Notch looks like it came from the West (like a rutulus male). One has to bear in mind the actions of the glaciers, which did bring northwestern material into the northeast.<<<

There are also strange Clouded Sulphurs at Mount Washington, both on the bottom at Pinkham Notch, and in the Subarctic Zone. On Saturday, Matt Arey and I found them flying over blueberry barrens on the bottom; this is a practice that I have previously clearly noticed in early August at 4700 feet. What are Clouded Sulphurs doing flying over blueberry barrens?? The very fine Alberta/ B.C. Lepidopterist Norbert Kondla has informed me in response to photos of some of these high altitude "philodice" that they look like they are some sort of "mixture" of philodice with interior (? I don't know how THAT can be) and also regarding another specimen, a female from 4700 ft., that the specimen is a " 'something'...It is a 'something' because it doesn't look like anything..." (en quote). This is, again, from a Western Canadian veteran Lepidopterist who knows a thing or two about Boreal Colias. There are also unusual "philodice" to be found at the Scott Bog region (Moose Alley) in extreme!
  northern New Hampshire, at +/- 2000 ft. elevation.

We clearly do NOT know everything about our "bugs" in northern New England.

And regarding the Baltimores, which are known as single brood bugs, how do you have a flight in central Maine in early June, followed by a second flight in early July; or a flight of fresh males at Wilson Mills, Maine in mid-June, and another apparent flight at Pinkham Notch, NH in mid-July; and a flight in southeastern Vermont (low elevation) in mid-late July? This all doesn't add up. On top of that there are different phenotypes among all of these....

Alex

Alex Grkovich
BALA | TMP  
617 357 6060 ext. 329  |  [log in to unmask]

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Butterfly Survey [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Bryan Pfeiffer
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 8:56 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: 2 tiger swallowtails of Grand Isle, 17-July

Although I recognize this practice isn't for everyone, I try to collected tiger swallowtails I see in July and August here in Vermont (and elsewhere in the north).
We still have so much to learn!

By the way, I spent some quality time with Baltimore Checkerspots (/Euphydryas phaeton/)-in every stage of life-last week:
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3a%2f%2fbryanpfeiffer.com%2f2016%2f07%2f15%2fa-complete-butterfly-life-on-a-single-day%2f&data=01%7c01%7cAG%40BALATMP.COM%7c6c487eeebddd47e4df0508d3af0ad853%7c2e6e62c5ddae422ea7e6902b42c67999%7c0&sdata=8LTGgey%2fUkdLXq7cMrptz14ROhNopkyOm%2f4%2fUqd4ayk%3d

Best,
Bryan

On 7/18/16 8:29 AM, Alex Grkovich wrote:
>
> Yeah, Dave.these are NOT Canadian Tiger Swallowtails.
>
> These resemble an entity that I have previously found at about this
> time of year (July 26 for example) on Boston's North Shore (Essex Co.).
>
> I don't think that they are Eastern Tigers (P. glaucus) either.
>
> There is rather apparently an unknown entity - at least one -
> occurring in the northern half of New England.
>
> Alex
>
> *Alex Grkovich*
>
> BALA | TMP
>
> 617 357 6060 ext. 329 | [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>
> *From:*Vermont Butterfly Survey [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On
> Behalf Of *David Hoag
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 17, 2016 11:08 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* 2 tiger swallowtails of Grand Isle, 17-July
>
> 2 tiger swallowtails of Grand Isle, 17-July
>
> Dave Hoag
>

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