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We have a small Pacer pump that we use for irrigation that is a frequent flyer at the small engine shop, leaving us high and dry.  The shop owner says it’s not a piece of junk.   The diagnosis is always “water in the carb”  and apparently it’s not an easy carb to deal with.  We only use ethanol-free gas from the local Stewarts and siphon off any gas that remains in the tank when the pump stops running.  The shop owner has gone from implying that we’re incompetent (suggesting we might have poured water in the tank) to wondering if we are victims of sabotage to blaming the gas.  He says that he couldn’t even start his generator during a power outage until after he cleaned the carb by flashlight.   When I pour the last of our gas from our metal safety can into a glass jar, I see only a few little bubbles at the bottom, but I see how they could accumulate when the pump is running constantly.  I don’t know if the water is coming in with the gas or condensing in the can—when the dew point gets up to 75, as it has done, there’s a lot of water available to condense (too bad it just doesn’t condense and rain!).   

Are other people experiencing these difficulties with gasoline-powered pumps and does anyone have any ideas?  We would gladly buy a different pump or get our gas elsewhere if we could avoid this problem.  Or is it something we are doing?  

Debby Jaffe
Long Days Farm
Buskirk, NY