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Hah!  Very funny, and so right.  Coopers definitely have 'tude.

There's a legendary anecdote from early 1900s or so about a farm wife 
hearing a commotion outside and opening the kitchen door and having a 
terrified hen run in and dive under her full skirts, and a Cooper 
following right behind.  I believe it.

Jane
(Shoreham)


On 1/1/2017 12:47 PM, Richard Harlow wrote:
> Martha,
>
> Did you recall whether the hawk had a neck? A head close to the
> shoulders a Sharpie, some form of neck a Cooper's.
> From what you said it sounds like a Sharpie. However, a male Cooper's is
> smaller then the female.
> From my experience a Cooper's in most instances will stand its ground.
> They have a definite attitude, they are arrogant,
> intimidating, and feel that the space there in is theirs. I've had one
> eating a Mourning Dove
> outside my ground floor window. A Sharpie is more skittish then a
> Cooper's. Your call.
>
> Dick Harlow
> Middlebury
>
>
>
> On 1/1/17 12:17, Martha McClintock wrote:
>> I had just been watching birds at the feeder from my kitchen window, 30
>> mourning doves, 6 blue jays, 2 chickadees, 1 hairy and 1 downy.  Nothing
>> interesting so I turned away.  Within 30 seconds, there was a loud
>> thud as
>> a mourning dove hit the window.  I looked out to the snow to see if the
>> bird was just dazed and would recover.  An adult sharp shinned hawk was
>> standing above the dazed (or more) dove and then flew away with him.
>>
>> While I have seen sharp shinned hawks a number of times near my home,
>> this
>> was a clear view from only 2-3 yards away...the red eye. the absolutely
>> square tail and the adult plumage were beautiful.
>>
>> It seems more likely that the hawk was a Cooper's, according to what I
>> just
>> read but the square tail and the size makes me think sharp-shinned.
>> Could
>> a sharp-shinned catch and carry a mourning dove?
>>
>> And, by the way, I now have no birds at my feeder.
>>
>> Martha
>> Westford
>>