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We certainly haven't had much in the way of snow cover here in the lower 
valley this winter, never mind a tough ice layer.  But I also have not 
been seeing Barred Owls out and about, never mind as road kill.

There was one winter a few years ago -- 5 or 6 years? -- when this 
problem of ice cover was obvious-- a couple of hard layers of ice with 2 
or 3 inches of snow in between-- and Barred Owls were everywhere in the 
daytime and beginning to drop like flies from starvation by spring. 
That was a horrible sight.

There's been nothing like that this year, or in other years really.

Jane
(Shoreham)

On 1/20/2017 9:46 PM, Thomas Barber wrote:
> Hi All,
>
>
> Has anyone else noticed that this story - about barred owls starving
> and getting hit by cars - hits the birding news every year. Each time
> it is presented as something out of the ordinary, yet it happens
> every year. there has been little snow cover to hide rodents here in
> the Champlain Valley this year, but the owls are still appearing.
>
>
> I am more inclined to think that each year beginning in January or
> early February, the adult owls that have established territories kick
> the young out in preparation for mating season. Lacking a territory
> of their own, these young forage far and wide looking for food. And
> roadsides are a great place to do this. Red-tailed hawks and other
> predators also find roadsides convenient.
>
>
> If barred owls starving every winter is indeed the cause of this
> annual appearance, I would like to see some science.
>
>
> Tom
>
>
> ________________________________ From: Vermont Birds
> <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Jane Stein
> <[log in to unmask]> Sent: Friday, January 20, 2017 9:23 PM To:
> [log in to unmask] Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Article on flurry of
> injured Barred owls
>
> https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/
> [https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/1-12-17-ruffed-grouse-aspens-049a2566.jpg?w=590]<https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/>
>
>  Naturally Curious with Mary Holland | An online resource
> ...<https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/>
> naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com Poplar (also called
> Aspen) buds are an important winter food source for wildlife, but for
> none as much as the Ruffed Grouse. During the course of a year, a
> Ruffed ...
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 1/20/2017 9:13 PM, Eve Ticknor wrote:
>> What is the address for this blog?
>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:57 PM, Sue <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Mary Holland's blog today also deals with this problem. Sue
>>> Wetmore
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>>> On Jan 20, 2017, at 8:36 PM, H Nicolay <[log in to unmask]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi all, if you have a chance, the Addison County independent
>>>> wrote an article yesterday on why so many Barred owls are
>>>> getting hit on the road. The article is also online.
>>>>
>>>> Helena Nicolay Wildlife rehabilitator Monkton, Vermont
>>
>> Eve Ticknor Box 2206 Prescott, On  K0E 1T0 Canada res:
>> 613-925-5528 cell: 613-859-9545
>>
>> The Blue Nest 24 Birch Ave, Willsboro, NY 12996 U S A res:
>> 518-963-7404 cell: 518-524-7377
>>
>> http://aquavisions.me
> [http://aquavisions.me/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/IMG_2744-300x225.jpg]<http://aquavisions.me/>
>
>  Aquavisions | Photography by Eve Ticknor<http://aquavisions.me/>
> aquavisions.me This has been a strange winter, a delayed winter, with
> nearly no snow in the Willsboro / Essex area. Most of the lake is
> still open, just freezing around the edges.
>
>
>
>>
>> The bad news is time flies. The good news is you're the pilot.
>>