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Dear colleagues,



We would like to draw your attention to the session we are organizing at the next Goldschmidt conference, which will be held in Paris from the 13th to the 18th of August 2017.


Session 08a will focus on understanding processes and controls on precipitation and dissolution of minerals changing a rock's (micro) structure and geochemistry, thereby using dynamic (3D) visualization and identification techniques that allow to reconstruct and quantify reaction pathways or petrophysical/mechanical property changes. We especially encourage contributions focusing on and combining results from field-based and in-vitro experimental setups both in the absence of (abiotic) or in tight interaction with micro-organisms, as well as from natural or man-made environments (e.g. CO2 storage, geothermal applications).


We are glad that the session will feature a keynote lecture by Ass. Prof. Dr. Lauren E. Beckingham (Auburn University, Auburn, USA), as well as invited talks by Dr. Ulrike Troitzsch (ANU, Canberra, Australia) and Dr. Stefan Krause (GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany).



We are happy to receive your contributions via

https://goldschmidt.info/2017/abstracts (Deadline April 1, 2017)



Sincerely,

Dorothee Hippler, Eva De Boever, and Anneleen Foubert







Session description:



08A: UNRAVELLING THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF STRUCTURAL AND GEOCHEMICAL HETEROGENEITY - INSIGHTS FROM EXPERIMENTS AND NATURAL MATERIALS



Rock-forming minerals and rocks typically show structural and geochemical heterogeneity over the nano- to meterscale. These heterogeneities can either result from primary formation or be enhanced by the complex interplay of different diagenetic and/or alteration processes. To understand the changes in the (micro) structure and geochemistry in experimental approaches as well as in natural materials, quantitative in-situ analytical techniques (e.g. Raman spectroscopy, XRD, XRF) have to be combined with high-resolution visualization techniques, such as X-ray tomography, FIB-SEM, neutron or laser scanning confocal microscopy. These methods can provide direct and possibly continuous information on chemical or mineralogical speciation and on the structure with nm- to Ám scale spatial resolution. Experimental or field-based approaches are thus needed in order to identify and detangle the fundamental reaction mechanisms and the impact of individual alteration processes on 3D structure and chemistry and allows quantifying reaction pathways as well as understanding petrophysical (e.g. microporosity) and mechanical property changes of various geological materials. This session welcomes contributions related to different aspects of precipitation and dissolution of minerals using dynamic visualization, identification and quantification techniques, both in the absence of (abiotic) or in tight interaction with micro-organisms. We especially encourage contributions focusing on and combining results from experimental setups as well as from natural or man-made environments (e.g. CO2 storage, geothermal applications). Emphasis is placed in particular on studies of carbonate (amorphous) precursors and mineral (trans) formation in natural surroundings and in material sciences as well as on monitoring of precipitation dynamics in ambient, submarine or hydrothermal environments.?


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