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I found that whenever I would go into a sharp dip the skis would bend and
the bindings would release and I would inevitably be sprung into a
faceplant...no fun. this happened enough times to know that it is the
bindings with that kind of terrain and that it was not a good choice for
inbounds skiing. Since I had so much sciatic pain in the last few years I
stopped touring and just kept with good alpine bindings. In fact, I think
that the failed bindings and also a failed brake one time after the skis
had traveled, may have been the cause of all the sciatica. Now that the
pain is gone and I can make my way on skis vertically and uphill, I was
considering an AT set up or perhaps resurrecting my old skis and bindings
for those days that I might choose to earn turns. Honestly, I prefer the
downhill and would rather ride a lift up, but I see the benefits of
skinning and I surely could use a good aerobic workout. Trying to get into
shape for ski season...maybe I will excavate the skier's edge from storage.

On Wed, Nov 8, 2017 at 12:57 PM, Kevin Broderick <[log in to unmask]
> wrote:

> So, to summarize: sideways release at the toe does a good job of
> protecting the tibia, because the tibia is centered on the release pivot
> point and the torque is measured at the other end of the boot. Sideways
> release at the heel isn't so great at protecting the tibia, because the
> pivot point is a bootsole away, thus increasing the torque felt on the
> tibia before release if force is applied forward of the toe and decreasing
> it if force is applied behind the toe. This has the side effect of
> generally reducing force on the knee prior to release, thus mitigating ACL
> risk. Did I get that right?
>
> Anecdotally, I have to be careful while buckling my boots in my tech
> bindings (Radical ST 2.0 on my touring setup and Beast 16 on powder
> boards), or I'll twist out of the binding. Not usually an issue while
> standing still, but trying to buckle boots while sliding away from the
> unload station on a powder day can result in a release. I've also had both
> sets of Dynafit-mounted skis release when I goofed up a kick turn, well
> before feeling any significant torque on my leg.
>
> I have not had problems with either in respect to general
> release/retention—I think I've had one or two crash-related releases, but
> I've not had either come off during skiing once they were on properly (just
> like an alpine binding, if you try to step into the binding when the
> binding and/or the boot are caked in snow and ice, you may get a false
> engagement).
>
> With that said, having already broken one tibia as a result of a poor
> match between binding (and binding settings) and chosen activity, I think
> I'll be putting the Tectrons on my next pair of AT-mounted skis.
>
> On Wed, Nov 8, 2017 at 5:24 AM, Randy Witlicki <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
>>   iSki wrote:
>>
>> >  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwIx8vIHEec
>>
>>   There  is also:
>>
>> https://www.wildsnow.com/15123/tech-binding-release-testing-
>> acl-broken-leg/
>>
>>   (long with lots of tech stuff)
>>
>>
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