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Thanks for the clarification, Kamran!

Lorraine Daston is a great source -- this is far more her area than mine.

The classic that comes to my mind immediately is, as I'm sure already 
know, Carolyn Merchant's /The Death of Nature/. There was an excellent 
revisiting of the book in a special section of the history of science 
journal /Isis /back in 2006, where five scholars (including Merchant 
herself) reflect on the significance of the book and its arguments, and 
the scholarship since. Since you asked especially for literature 
reviews, I think these articles will give you many good leads. They're 
attached.

All best,

Sigrid




On 12/29/2017 02:01 PM, Kamran Nayeri wrote:
> Dear Sigrid:
>
> Thanks for your response.  Allow me to be more specific.  I am 
> interested in technology and science as means of human attempt at 
> mastery over nature.  For 290,000 years Homo sapiens thrived with a 
> worldview that did not have sharp lines of demarcation between "us" 
> and the rest of nature. About 10,000 years ago, that changed with the 
> rise of the first farmers. But early farmers systematically 
> domesticated plants and animals hence a new worldview emerged: 
> anthropocentrism (human-centeredness).  I am interested in learning as 
> much as I can about the use of technology and science that has been 
> used in history to dominate and control nature.  In my view, that is 
> at the base of all class societies and the root-cause of alienation 
> from nature (hence social alienation). (I have written this up in Part 
> 2 
> <http://knayeri.blogspot.com/2017/06/economics-socialism-and-ecology.html> 
> of my Economics, Socialism, and Ecology: A Critical Outline) To 
> address the present-day social and planetary crisis (one and the same 
> from my perspective), we must work our way out of this dilemma. 
> Science for the People would be a group of us that embraces a 
> transition to a new science and technology paradigm that works with 
> nature and not to dominate and control it for the human purpose at a 
> cost to other species.
>
> I have received valuable recommendations from Chandler Davis, Phil 
> Gasper, and Prof. Lorraine Dostan (Director, Max Planck Institute for 
> the History of Science) who Chandler introduced to me.
>
> If you and others any suggested reading (I would eventually need to 
> choose a few as the list gets larger) I would be much obliged.
>
> Once I have more recommendation, I will share the suggested readings 
> with the entire list.
>
> Happy 2018.
>
> Kamran
>
> On Fri, Dec 29, 2017 at 4:50 AM, Sigrid Schmalzer 
> <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>> wrote:
>
>     The field is so vast... Which areas are you most interested in?
>
>     If you want books on SftP or related subjects (history of science
>     and political activism in the Cold War US), here are a few good ones:
>
>     Kelly Moore, /Disrupting Science
>     <https://press.princeton.edu/titles/8545.html>
>     /Sarah Bridger, /Scientists at War
>     <http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674736825>
>     /Paul Rubinson, /Redefining Science/
>     <https://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/redefining-science>
>     and of course... the new Science for the People documentary
>     collection available this week!! /Science for the People:
>     Documents from America's Movement of Radical Scientists/
>     <http://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/science-people>
>
>     But of course there are lots of other subjects out there of
>     interest. :)
>
>
>
>     On 12/28/2017 12:08 PM, Kamran Nayeri wrote:
>>     Dear folks:
>>
>>     Could anyone recommend really good literature review(s) or books
>>     on the history of science and technology?
>>
>>     Thank you.
>>
>>     Kamran
>
>     -- 
>     Sigrid Schmalzer
>     Professor, History Department
>     University of Massachusetts Amherst
>
>     /Red Revolution, Green Revolution: Scientific Farming in Socialist
>     China/
>     <http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/R/bo22541357.html>
>     (University of Chicago Press, 2016)
>
>     Forthcoming from UMass Press in December, 2017: /Science for the
>     People: Documents from America's Movement of Radical Scientists/
>     <https://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/science-people>
>
>     Forthcoming from Tilbury House Publishers in February, 2018: /Moth
>     and Wasp, Soil and Ocean: Remembering Chinese Scientist Pu
>     Zhelong/
>     <https://tilburyhouse.com/book/education-and-teaching/by-subject/multicultural/moth-and-wasp-soil-and-ocean/>
>     (picture book)
>
>
>
>
> -- 
> Kamran Nayeri

-- 
Sigrid Schmalzer
Professor, History Department
University of Massachusetts Amherst

/Red Revolution, Green Revolution: Scientific Farming in Socialist 
China/ 
<http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/R/bo22541357.html> 
(University of Chicago Press, 2016)

Forthcoming from UMass Press in December, 2017: /Science for the People: 
Documents from America's Movement of Radical Scientists/ 
<https://www.umass.edu/umpress/title/science-people>

Forthcoming from Tilbury House Publishers in February, 2018: /Moth and 
Wasp, Soil and Ocean: Remembering Chinese Scientist Pu Zhelong/ 
<https://tilburyhouse.com/book/education-and-teaching/by-subject/multicultural/moth-and-wasp-soil-and-ocean/> 
(picture book)