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​​2018 hails new literacies.  To be a learner in 2018 places new demands, demands that are dynamic, ever changing.  So we need to be thinking about learning opportunities that help our students learn how to learn, including understanding how things operate (from a search algorithm to microcontrollers to hardware to...)

Consider the new library framework for standards from AASL:

I. INQUIRE  Build new knowledge by inquiring, thinking critically, identifying problems, and developing strategies for solving problems.
II. INCLUDE Demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to inclusiveness and respect for diversity in the learning community.
III. COLLABORATE  Work effectively with others to broaden perspectives and work toward common goals.
IV. CURATE  Make meaning for oneself and others by collecting, organizing, and sharing resources of personal relevance. 
V. EXPLORE  Discover and innovate in a growth mindset developed through experience and reflection. 
VI. ENGAGE  Demonstrate safe, legal, and ethical creating and sharing of knowledge products independently while engaging in a community of practice and an interconnected world.

And from the NCTE, active, successful participants in this 21st century global society must be able to:
Regardless of the framework we adopt, students should understand what they're learning and why- and how to personalize learning for their own needs and interests.

Best,
Shannon


On Wed, Jan 3, 2018 at 10:17 AM, Elizabeth McCarthy <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I think the New Media Consortium's report provides a nice framework for digital literacy. 



Elizabeth McCarthy, MAT
Digital Learning Specialist
Google for Education Certified Trainer


On Tue, Jan 2, 2018 at 3:09 PM, Scott Grant <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I think there are different components, but let me ask what do we define as Digital Literacy vs the definition of Technology Literacy?  I haven't used Google to define them myself, but I see them as roughly the same.  

When we speak of students (and teachers) reaching a point of "Literacy" related to computers/devices, I see it as the students being able to utilize the device with ease, and having a general understanding of how to not only use the device, but also how to use it in as fluid and time-saving a way that it is almost second-nature for the student.  The struggle though is that the technology is still constantly evolving, meaning that not only do we need to teach the existing technology but teach it in such a way that they can easily grow with the technology as it evolves.  This includes preparing students to be ready for the various flavors of technology (Windows/Mac/Linux/ChromeOS/iOS/Android-flavors) so that they are comfortable with each.  In time though, all of these will work toward a single interface, but we're still a ways off from that.


On Tue, Jan 2, 2018 at 1:58 PM, Elizabeth McCarthy <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
I think it's important to consider "what is digital literacy vs technology literacy?"  I think there are key distinctions between hardware, software, and the new literacy skills needed today.  

Elizabeth McCarthy, MAT
Digital Learning Specialist
Google for Education Certified Trainer


On Mon, Jan 1, 2018 at 5:55 PM, Lucie deLaBruere <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Hopefully you're not reading this today...   but when you do read it,  I'd love to hear how your school defines or assesses  technology/computer/digital literacy in either students or educators. 



As often happens on January 1 - many of us reflect on the past year and future year.

In this state I found myself  reading a blog post written in 2013 that got me thinking about 'technology literacy'.   

With all the discussions about #futureReady happening in a year filled with leaks, hacks, security/privacy breaches, net neutrality legislation changes, fake news/social media concerns, etc

I'm wondering whether 2018 is a time to take a closer look at technology literacy needs of  our staff and students

Here are my two cents along with a link to Marc Scott's article


I'm sure that my thinking was also sparked by Vermont's adoption of ISTE Standards for Students  and recent conversations related to the educational technology specialist certification. 


Lucie


--
Lucie deLaBruere
www.LearningWithLucie.com
http://twitter.com/techsavvygirl

Google Voice (802) 557 0013

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Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else.
  - James M. Barrie
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Google Certified Educator / Google for Education Certified Trainer, Raspberry Pi Certified Educator

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--
Shannon Walters
Teacher Librarian
Burlington High School
52 Institute Road
Burlington, Vermont 05408
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802-864-8411 ext 23206

Governor's Institutes of Vermont
GIV Information Technology & Digital Media, Program Director
Winter Weekends Program Director
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"Students need to move from being simply knowledgeable to being knowledge-able."
~Michael Wesch

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