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Not medical, but an article on fake or misleading websites and a hunter looking for them.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/an-army-veteran-wages-war-on-social-media-disinformation-1539768600?mod=hp_listb_pos1 

Brian L. Baker, MLS, JD
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From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Fleuriel, Christine
Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 1:34 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: #ExtMail# Re: NYT advice on how to look up medical information online

FWIW (probably not much), I wrote a letter to the editor last night, noting that a colleague and I had co-written an article on just this topic, and that their piece really didn't say anything about *HOW* to look up information online. I'm not holding my breath, but as I get older, I'm less inclined to remain silent.


Chris
Christine Fleuriel, MSLIS
New Mexico VA Health Care System
1501 San Pedro SE
Albuquerque 87108
(505) 265-1711 ext 2248



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From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Metzger, Tina
Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 2:16 PM
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Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: #ExtMail# Re: NYT advice on how to look up medical information online

...My 24-year-old son's boss and his wife recently had their first child. My son texted me that the wife had currently been in labor for 15 hours. When I told him that was how long I had worked on delivering him, he said (and I "think" he was joking), "The Internet says it takes like five hours!"

Tina Metzger, MSIS | Librarian
Bon Secours Richmond Health System
Bon Secours Memorial College of Nursing
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Good Help to Those in Need®

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-----Original Message-----
From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Guessferd, Mary
Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 3:48 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: #ExtMail# Re: NYT advice on how to look up medical information online

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I apologize in advance, but I find this article to be woefully incomplete for a medical consumer, and I can't stay silent.

 "If you feel confident you can discern the difference between high- and low-quality information, search away. “I encourage my younger or tech-savvy patients to go online,” Cocco says."

Really??? For a couple reasons, this is awful advice. First, I have worked with supposedly tech savvy college students who had no idea what they were looking at online or how to determine if they were looking at good information on a reputable site. Yes, the author does recommend using "good" websites, but if you lack the ability to discern what is good information, that advice is useless.

Which leads me to the second reason - the first half of that sentence above: "if you feel confident you can discern the difference between high- and low-quality information, search away." How do you know if you're NOT finding good information, if you can't really tell the difference between good and bad information? There are plenty of websites that purport to provide legitimate information that are not, but without really looking closely a person can't tell. An example - how many websites are devoted to the anti-vaccine movement, which has been proven to be flawed at best, yet people continue to believe what they see on them.

To have an article like this in a major publication like the New York Times smack dab in the middle of National Medical Librarian month is doubly irresponsible. Shame on them.

I wish the author had completed this article with information a consumer can actually use with examples of great places online for the average Joe to look for information, like MedlinePlus, or cdc.gov, or Cleveland clinic, or Mayo Clinic, or labtests online? Heck - even MedScape and WebMD are better than googling and guessing. Have symptoms you want to review before visiting with your doctor? Try patient.info/symptom-checker.

My point - it's nice that the NYT put out an article on this topic, but it is woefully incomplete. And yes - a letter to the editor is in process.

Mimi

Mimi Guessferd, MSLIS
Librarian, VA Medical Center
Manchester, NH 03104
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-----Original Message-----
From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Anna Schnitzer
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2018 11:02 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [EXTERNAL] NYT advice on how to look up medical information online

Fellow Medlibbers:

The New York Times Magazine (October 14, 2018) has a tip for readers:


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/10/magazine/how-to-look-up-medical-information-online.html

/anna
--
Anna Ercoli Schnitzer
Informationist--Diversity and Inclusion
Taubman Health Sciences Library
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
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