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Thanks, Charlotte.  June passed away recently.  I would love to thank V.T. Personally for flying to Vermont....
----- Original Message -----
From: stowelulu <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Fri, 07 Dec 2018 08:34:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 5 Dec 2018 to 6 Dec 2018 (#2018-318)

Thanks, Ali, for the lovely memory of that Varied Thrush in Bolton and the amazing hospitality of the couple. It reminded me of the day Liz Lackey and I visited them and how warmly they welcomed us.  A Life List Bird for me!  
Charlotte 
Stowe Hollow 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 7, 2018, at 12:06 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> There are 12 messages totaling 685 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. South Burlington Rough Legged
>  2. VARIED THRUSH   324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
>  3. Peregrine at City Hall in Montpelier
>  4. grosbeaks return - briefly! (2)
>  5. VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018 (5)
>  6. please unsubscribe me.
>  7. <No subject given>
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 11:56:57 -0500
> From:    liz lee <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: South Burlington Rough Legged
> 
> I have seen a rough legged hawk twice this morning in South Burlington 
> on Rt. 116 (Hinesburg Rd.)  south of Kennedy Dr. First, perched on the 
> east side just south of Cheese Factory Rd. (I also saw it in this area a 
> few weeks ago), and then flying near the corner of Landon St. and  Rt 
> 116 a few hours later.
> 
> Liz Lee
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 18:09:58 +0000
> From:    Ruth Stewart <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: VARIED THRUSH   324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> This was an oh-so-brief look, but enough for me to recover from shock and take pictures. Pretty conclusive image!  Not seen in next half hr since.
> 
> 
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset, VT
> 
> 
> ________________________________________
> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:00 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
> Dec 6, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Comments:     Overcast,  28degrees, dusting of snow on gd. Continuous observation from Office for 4 hrs.
> 4 species (+1 other taxa)
> 
> Mourning Dove  8
> Blue Jay  15     Descended en mass, pigged out and left - 10:30am
> Black-capped Chickadee  4
> Varied Thrush/American Robin  1     I took a look at feeder activity and spotted this bird at 12:40pm. I immediately recognized it as a Varied Thrush and grabbed my camera to snapped pictures without even going through various field marks. It flew off in less than 1 min of picture taking.
> Dark-eyed Junco  4
> 
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50472506
> 
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 13:10:54 -0500
> From:    Richard Littauer <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Peregrine at City Hall in Montpelier
> 
> I saw a peregrine take and eat a pigeon on city hall half an hour ago.
> Still there right now. Seems to be unreported on eBird - great to see the
> bird here this afternoon.
> 
> R
> 
> 
> -- 
> Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
> <http://www.burntfen.com>
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 13:53:28 -0500
> From:    Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: grosbeaks return - briefly!
> 
> At least 21 Evening Grosbeaks appeared a little past 1PM, first eating seeds off two locust trees and then descending en masse and cleaning out three feeders - and then leaving. We’ve put out more seed, but I think the birds are delighting some other birder somewhere by now!
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 13:58:38 -0500
> From:    Charlie La Rosa <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> Glad to hear this! Brought back so many memories. I grew up in Brattleboro,
> on Pleasant St., and when I was perhaps in 6th grade, having studied the
> little Golden Guide to Birds (which had an illustration of a varied thrush
> near the beginning) from cover to cover and saved up to get my own copy of
> the cloth-covered Peterson, I came home one winter day for lunch, and my
> mother described a different bird she had seen that morning at our feeder,
> From her description, I knew it right away to be a varied thrush, a
> gorgeous bird. Well, the bird returned when I happened to be home and I
> identified it positively. We called Louise Mullen who, at that time, wrote
> a bird column for the Brattleboro Daily Reformer, and very soon the local
> birders were slowing down or stopping in front of the house to get a look
> at the thrush. The next day, when I got home for lunch, our street was
> lined with cars, and I found my mother serving tea and coffee in our
> kitchen to a crush of birders from near and far who had shown up to see the
> bird. There was a group from Mass. Audubon in Littleton that had made the
> trip. They also wanted to meet the boy who had identified the bird. Of
> course, people were skeptical at first, but once an adult birder, one who
> was deemed reliable enough, confirmed the ID, the gates were opened. The
> bird stayed around for a number of days and was very cooperative in giving
> audiences to the elite and not so elite of New England birders.
> 
> A couple of years later, a black-headed grosbeak showed up and there was no
> skepticism that time around. That was 56 or 57 years ago. We had throngs of
> evening grosbeaks crowding our feeder every day throughout the winter back
> then. Pine grosbeaks were a common occurrence in the big spruce tree in our
> neighbor's yard. Tree swallows nested in a box I made and put on the
> highest branch of our apple tree that was sturdy enough to still allow me
> to climb and get a look. Today, the apple is long gone, as are the cherry
> and the giant elm and the sugar maple in the front yard. I didn't notice
> any feeders around the last time I drove through the neighborhood. Nothing
> stays the same for very long, but I still feed the birds in winter.
> 
> Charlie La Rosa
> So. Washington, VT
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:10 PM Ruth Stewart <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> This was an oh-so-brief look, but enough for me to recover from shock and
>> take pictures. Pretty conclusive image!  Not seen in next half hr since.
>> 
>> 
>> Ruth Stewart
>> E. Dorset, VT
>> 
>> 
>> ________________________________________
>> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:00 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec
>> 6, 2018
>> 
>> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
>> Dec 6, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
>> Protocol: Stationary
>> Comments:     Overcast,  28degrees, dusting of snow on gd. Continuous
>> observation from Office for 4 hrs.
>> 4 species (+1 other taxa)
>> 
>> Mourning Dove  8
>> Blue Jay  15     Descended en mass, pigged out and left - 10:30am
>> Black-capped Chickadee  4
>> Varied Thrush/American Robin  1     I took a look at feeder activity and
>> spotted this bird at 12:40pm. I immediately recognized it as a Varied
>> Thrush and grabbed my camera to snapped pictures without even going through
>> various field marks. It flew off in less than 1 min of picture taking.
>> Dark-eyed Junco  4
>> 
>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50472506
>> 
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
>> https://ebird.org/home)
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 14:13:44 -0500
> From:    Scott Morrical <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> Beauty!  Congrats, Ruth!
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On Dec 6, 2018, at 1:58 PM, Charlie La Rosa <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Glad to hear this! Brought back so many memories. I grew up in Brattleboro,
>> on Pleasant St., and when I was perhaps in 6th grade, having studied the
>> little Golden Guide to Birds (which had an illustration of a varied thrush
>> near the beginning) from cover to cover and saved up to get my own copy of
>> the cloth-covered Peterson, I came home one winter day for lunch, and my
>> mother described a different bird she had seen that morning at our feeder,
>> From her description, I knew it right away to be a varied thrush, a
>> gorgeous bird. Well, the bird returned when I happened to be home and I
>> identified it positively. We called Louise Mullen who, at that time, wrote
>> a bird column for the Brattleboro Daily Reformer, and very soon the local
>> birders were slowing down or stopping in front of the house to get a look
>> at the thrush. The next day, when I got home for lunch, our street was
>> lined with cars, and I found my mother serving tea and coffee in our
>> kitchen to a crush of birders from near and far who had shown up to see the
>> bird. There was a group from Mass. Audubon in Littleton that had made the
>> trip. They also wanted to meet the boy who had identified the bird. Of
>> course, people were skeptical at first, but once an adult birder, one who
>> was deemed reliable enough, confirmed the ID, the gates were opened. The
>> bird stayed around for a number of days and was very cooperative in giving
>> audiences to the elite and not so elite of New England birders.
>> 
>> A couple of years later, a black-headed grosbeak showed up and there was no
>> skepticism that time around. That was 56 or 57 years ago. We had throngs of
>> evening grosbeaks crowding our feeder every day throughout the winter back
>> then. Pine grosbeaks were a common occurrence in the big spruce tree in our
>> neighbor's yard. Tree swallows nested in a box I made and put on the
>> highest branch of our apple tree that was sturdy enough to still allow me
>> to climb and get a look. Today, the apple is long gone, as are the cherry
>> and the giant elm and the sugar maple in the front yard. I didn't notice
>> any feeders around the last time I drove through the neighborhood. Nothing
>> stays the same for very long, but I still feed the birds in winter.
>> 
>> Charlie La Rosa
>> So. Washington, VT
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:10 PM Ruth Stewart <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> This was an oh-so-brief look, but enough for me to recover from shock and
>>> take pictures. Pretty conclusive image!  Not seen in next half hr since.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Ruth Stewart
>>> E. Dorset, VT
>>> 
>>> 
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:00 PM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec
>>> 6, 2018
>>> 
>>> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
>>> Dec 6, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
>>> Protocol: Stationary
>>> Comments:     Overcast,  28degrees, dusting of snow on gd. Continuous
>>> observation from Office for 4 hrs.
>>> 4 species (+1 other taxa)
>>> 
>>> Mourning Dove  8
>>> Blue Jay  15     Descended en mass, pigged out and left - 10:30am
>>> Black-capped Chickadee  4
>>> Varied Thrush/American Robin  1     I took a look at feeder activity and
>>> spotted this bird at 12:40pm. I immediately recognized it as a Varied
>>> Thrush and grabbed my camera to snapped pictures without even going through
>>> various field marks. It flew off in less than 1 min of picture taking.
>>> Dark-eyed Junco  4
>>> 
>>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50472506
>>> 
>>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
>>> https://ebird.org/home)
>>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 15:15:25 -0500
> From:    Jane Stein <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> Great story, Charlie.  Thanks for the reminiscences.  I've always wondered
> what it must be like to be the innocent recipients of so much attention
> from crowds of birders.  Some people hate it, apparently.  I love your
> mother's generous reaction!
> 
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
> 
> 
> On Thu, 6 Dec 2018 13:58:38 -0500, Charlie La Rosa
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> Glad to hear this! Brought back so many memories. I grew up in
> Brattleboro,
>> on Pleasant St., and when I was perhaps in 6th grade, having studied the
>> little Golden Guide to Birds (which had an illustration of a varied
> thrush
>> near the beginning) from cover to cover and saved up to get my own copy
> of
>> the cloth-covered Peterson, I came home one winter day for lunch, and my
>> mother described a different bird she had seen that morning at our
> feeder,
>> From her description, I knew it right away to be a varied thrush, a
>> gorgeous bird. Well, the bird returned when I happened to be home and I
>> identified it positively. We called Louise Mullen who, at that time,
> wrote
>> a bird column for the Brattleboro Daily Reformer, and very soon the
> local
>> birders were slowing down or stopping in front of the house to get a
> look
>> at the thrush. The next day, when I got home for lunch, our street was
>> lined with cars, and I found my mother serving tea and coffee in our
>> kitchen to a crush of birders from near and far who had shown up to see
> the
>> bird. There was a group from Mass. Audubon in Littleton that had made
> the
>> trip. They also wanted to meet the boy who had identified the bird. Of
>> course, people were skeptical at first, but once an adult birder, one
> who
>> was deemed reliable enough, confirmed the ID, the gates were opened. The
>> bird stayed around for a number of days and was very cooperative in
> giving
>> audiences to the elite and not so elite of New England birders.
>> 
>> A couple of years later, a black-headed grosbeak showed up and there was
> no
>> skepticism that time around. That was 56 or 57 years ago. We had throngs
> of
>> evening grosbeaks crowding our feeder every day throughout the winter
> back
>> then. Pine grosbeaks were a common occurrence in the big spruce tree in
> our
>> neighbor's yard. Tree swallows nested in a box I made and put on the
>> highest branch of our apple tree that was sturdy enough to still allow
> me
>> to climb and get a look. Today, the apple is long gone, as are the
> cherry
>> and the giant elm and the sugar maple in the front yard. I didn't notice
>> any feeders around the last time I drove through the neighborhood.
> Nothing
>> stays the same for very long, but I still feed the birds in winter.
>> 
>> Charlie La Rosa
>> So. Washington, VT
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:10 PM Ruth Stewart <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>> 
>>> This was an oh-so-brief look, but enough for me to recover from shock
> and
>>> take pictures. Pretty conclusive image!  Not seen in next half hr
> since.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Ruth Stewart
>>> E. Dorset, VT
>>> 
>>> 
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:00 PM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset,
> Dec
>>> 6, 2018
>>> 
>>> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
>>> Dec 6, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
>>> Protocol: Stationary
>>> Comments:     Overcast,  28degrees, dusting of snow on gd. Continuous
>>> observation from Office for 4 hrs.
>>> 4 species (+1 other taxa)
>>> 
>>> Mourning Dove  8
>>> Blue Jay  15     Descended en mass, pigged out and left - 10:30am
>>> Black-capped Chickadee  4
>>> Varied Thrush/American Robin  1     I took a look at feeder activity
> and
>>> spotted this bird at 12:40pm. I immediately recognized it as a Varied
>>> Thrush and grabbed my camera to snapped pictures without even going
>>> through
>>> various field marks. It flew off in less than 1 min of picture taking.
>>> Dark-eyed Junco  4
>>> 
>>> View this checklist online at
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50472506
>>> 
>>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
>>> https://ebird.org/home)
>>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 21:05:15 +0000
> From:    Dawn Little <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: please unsubscribe me.
> 
> Please take my name off the list.
> Thanks,
> Dawn Little
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 16:59:25 -0500
> From:    Ruth Coppersmith <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> Sweet story.  Thanks for sharing Charlie
> 
>> On Dec 6, 2018, at 1:58 PM, Charlie La Rosa <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Glad to hear this! Brought back so many memories. I grew up in Brattleboro,
>> on Pleasant St., and when I was perhaps in 6th grade, having studied the
>> little Golden Guide to Birds (which had an illustration of a varied thrush
>> near the beginning) from cover to cover and saved up to get my own copy of
>> the cloth-covered Peterson, I came home one winter day for lunch, and my
>> mother described a different bird she had seen that morning at our feeder,
>> From her description, I knew it right away to be a varied thrush, a
>> gorgeous bird. Well, the bird returned when I happened to be home and I
>> identified it positively. We called Louise Mullen who, at that time, wrote
>> a bird column for the Brattleboro Daily Reformer, and very soon the local
>> birders were slowing down or stopping in front of the house to get a look
>> at the thrush. The next day, when I got home for lunch, our street was
>> lined with cars, and I found my mother serving tea and coffee in our
>> kitchen to a crush of birders from near and far who had shown up to see the
>> bird. There was a group from Mass. Audubon in Littleton that had made the
>> trip. They also wanted to meet the boy who had identified the bird. Of
>> course, people were skeptical at first, but once an adult birder, one who
>> was deemed reliable enough, confirmed the ID, the gates were opened. The
>> bird stayed around for a number of days and was very cooperative in giving
>> audiences to the elite and not so elite of New England birders.
>> 
>> A couple of years later, a black-headed grosbeak showed up and there was no
>> skepticism that time around. That was 56 or 57 years ago. We had throngs of
>> evening grosbeaks crowding our feeder every day throughout the winter back
>> then. Pine grosbeaks were a common occurrence in the big spruce tree in our
>> neighbor's yard. Tree swallows nested in a box I made and put on the
>> highest branch of our apple tree that was sturdy enough to still allow me
>> to climb and get a look. Today, the apple is long gone, as are the cherry
>> and the giant elm and the sugar maple in the front yard. I didn't notice
>> any feeders around the last time I drove through the neighborhood. Nothing
>> stays the same for very long, but I still feed the birds in winter.
>> 
>> Charlie La Rosa
>> So. Washington, VT
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:10 PM Ruth Stewart <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> This was an oh-so-brief look, but enough for me to recover from shock and
>>> take pictures. Pretty conclusive image!  Not seen in next half hr since.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Ruth Stewart
>>> E. Dorset, VT
>>> 
>>> 
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:00 PM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec
>>> 6, 2018
>>> 
>>> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
>>> Dec 6, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
>>> Protocol: Stationary
>>> Comments:     Overcast,  28degrees, dusting of snow on gd. Continuous
>>> observation from Office for 4 hrs.
>>> 4 species (+1 other taxa)
>>> 
>>> Mourning Dove  8
>>> Blue Jay  15     Descended en mass, pigged out and left - 10:30am
>>> Black-capped Chickadee  4
>>> Varied Thrush/American Robin  1     I took a look at feeder activity and
>>> spotted this bird at 12:40pm. I immediately recognized it as a Varied
>>> Thrush and grabbed my camera to snapped pictures without even going through
>>> various field marks. It flew off in less than 1 min of picture taking.
>>> Dark-eyed Junco  4
>>> 
>>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50472506
>>> 
>>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
>>> https://ebird.org/home)
>>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 20:53:25 -0500
> From:    Mundi Smithers <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: grosbeaks return - briefly!
> 
> They have performed much the same here in North Pownal.  They blow in, perform a feeding frenzy, and Poof, they are gone!  Kiss and tell!
> 
> Mundi
> North Pownal
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
> Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
> 
>> On Dec 6, 2018, at 1:53 PM, Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> At least 21 Evening Grosbeaks appeared a little past 1PM, first eating seeds off two locust trees and then descending en masse and cleaning out three feeders - and then leaving. We’ve put out more seed, but I think the birds are delighting some other birder somewhere by now!
>> Maeve Kim
>> Jericho Center
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 21:19:01 -0500
> From:    alison wagner <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> Thanks, Ruth and Charlie!  Varied Thrushes will always remind me of “V.T.,” who spent the winter months some years ago, in a trailer park in Bolton.  The bird appeared in the yard of Don and June Kinney at a crucial time in June’s life.  She was weakened by a heart condition, in need of surgery, and she credited “V.T.” with saving her life.  From her bedroom window she would look for this bird every morning.  Don made special suet cakes to bribe the bird to stay, which it did until spring.    And like the story Charlie told, their home was open to every obsessive birder that knocked on their door.  I remember one visit, walking into her bedroom to find several people sitting on the edge of her bed, chatting while peering out the window in hopes to see the bird.   Another time she said with a smile and a sparkle in her eye, “ I have never entertained so many men in my bedroom before now.”  There was so much life and love packed into that cozy home.   The bird,!
  and the birding friends that she made, gave her the strength to live.  I will never forget June, her wonderful spirit and sense of humor.  Birds bring people to friendships....that’s a pretty amazing feat for such a small creature.
> 
> Ali
> Huntington
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Ruth Coppersmith <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Thu, 06 Dec 2018 16:59:25 -0500 (EST)
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VARIED THRUSH 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec 6, 2018
> 
> Sweet story.  Thanks for sharing Charlie
> 
>> On Dec 6, 2018, at 1:58 PM, Charlie La Rosa <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> Glad to hear this! Brought back so many memories. I grew up in Brattleboro,
>> on Pleasant St., and when I was perhaps in 6th grade, having studied the
>> little Golden Guide to Birds (which had an illustration of a varied thrush
>> near the beginning) from cover to cover and saved up to get my own copy of
>> the cloth-covered Peterson, I came home one winter day for lunch, and my
>> mother described a different bird she had seen that morning at our feeder,
>> From her description, I knew it right away to be a varied thrush, a
>> gorgeous bird. Well, the bird returned when I happened to be home and I
>> identified it positively. We called Louise Mullen who, at that time, wrote
>> a bird column for the Brattleboro Daily Reformer, and very soon the local
>> birders were slowing down or stopping in front of the house to get a look
>> at the thrush. The next day, when I got home for lunch, our street was
>> lined with cars, and I found my mother serving tea and coffee in our
>> kitchen to a crush of birders from near and far who had shown up to see the
>> bird. There was a group from Mass. Audubon in Littleton that had made the
>> trip. They also wanted to meet the boy who had identified the bird. Of
>> course, people were skeptical at first, but once an adult birder, one who
>> was deemed reliable enough, confirmed the ID, the gates were opened. The
>> bird stayed around for a number of days and was very cooperative in giving
>> audiences to the elite and not so elite of New England birders.
>> 
>> A couple of years later, a black-headed grosbeak showed up and there was no
>> skepticism that time around. That was 56 or 57 years ago. We had throngs of
>> evening grosbeaks crowding our feeder every day throughout the winter back
>> then. Pine grosbeaks were a common occurrence in the big spruce tree in our
>> neighbor's yard. Tree swallows nested in a box I made and put on the
>> highest branch of our apple tree that was sturdy enough to still allow me
>> to climb and get a look. Today, the apple is long gone, as are the cherry
>> and the giant elm and the sugar maple in the front yard. I didn't notice
>> any feeders around the last time I drove through the neighborhood. Nothing
>> stays the same for very long, but I still feed the birds in winter.
>> 
>> Charlie La Rosa
>> So. Washington, VT
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Thu, Dec 6, 2018 at 1:10 PM Ruth Stewart <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> This was an oh-so-brief look, but enough for me to recover from shock and
>>> take pictures. Pretty conclusive image!  Not seen in next half hr since.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Ruth Stewart
>>> E. Dorset, VT
>>> 
>>> 
>>> ________________________________________
>>> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 1:00 PM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Dec
>>> 6, 2018
>>> 
>>> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
>>> Dec 6, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
>>> Protocol: Stationary
>>> Comments:     Overcast,  28degrees, dusting of snow on gd. Continuous
>>> observation from Office for 4 hrs.
>>> 4 species (+1 other taxa)
>>> 
>>> Mourning Dove  8
>>> Blue Jay  15     Descended en mass, pigged out and left - 10:30am
>>> Black-capped Chickadee  4
>>> Varied Thrush/American Robin  1     I took a look at feeder activity and
>>> spotted this bird at 12:40pm. I immediately recognized it as a Varied
>>> Thrush and grabbed my camera to snapped pictures without even going through
>>> various field marks. It flew off in less than 1 min of picture taking.
>>> Dark-eyed Junco  4
>>> 
>>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50472506
>>> 
>>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
>>> https://ebird.org/home)
>>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Thu, 6 Dec 2018 21:28:13 -0500
> From:    Kent McFarland <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: <No subject given>
> 
> I had big dreams when we kick off Vermont eBird, the first state portal,
> way back in 2003. But this outcome blows those early dreams away! The bird
> observations submitted by you and many others contribute to these exciting
> new results. Introducing the eBird Status and Trends—detailed population
> information for 107 species of North American birds, providing an
> unprecedented depth of information in four key areas: abundance maps,
> 10-year population trend maps, habitat association charts, and range maps.
> All brought to you by birders like you and data scientists at team eBird.
> Check out the whole story on Vermont eBird, see some example maps (spoiler
> alert: the Wood Thrush breeding season population trend map will make you
> cry), and explore more results.
> 
> 
> Read the whole story and explore more on Vermont eBird, a project of the
> Vermont Atlas of Life, at
> https://ebird.org/vt/news/a-new-era-of-ebird-science-status-and-trends
> 
> 
> Let's keep the data rolling in Green Mountain birders! Per capita, we're
> the best!
> 
> 
> Thank you!
> 
> Kent
> 
> 
> _________________________
> 
> KP McFarland added,____________________________
> 
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> @KPMcFarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
> Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life <http://val.vtecostudies.org>
> <https://vtecostudies.org/>
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 5 Dec 2018 to 6 Dec 2018 (#2018-318)
> ***********************************************************