Print

Print


Hi Jane. Owls will surprisingly eat deceased rodents as long as it looks
like a rodent and is brown. I had owls snub at white mice. Capturing an owl
is indeed stressful for it but I have released countless injured owls that
were grabbed and stuffed in a box and driven for many hours with no ill
effect. Grabbing a raptor is more of a huge indignity and incredulity for
it since it cannot comprehend you are trying to help. Helena.

On Sun, Jan 20, 2019, 4:28 PM Jane Stein <[log in to unmask] wrote:

> Oh, there's a thought with the mouse corpses.  Thanks, Helena.  If I can
> slog my way through this snow, I may try that, although mice tend to be
> deep in their burrows this time of year and not invading my house to be
> snapped!  In future, maybe I'll put some deceased mice from the late fall
> home invasion push in my freezer, but for the next months, the cupboard
> will be bare.  My next-door neighbor, half a mile down the road, has horses
> and surely lots of mice year-round, but she and they go on vacay for the
> winter months.  The house on the other side is on the market and vacant for
> now.  Nuts!
>
> I worry that my doing that, though, would further stress any owl in the
> vicinity, which I surely don't want to do.  I wouldn't dream of trying to
> capture one for that reason alone.  Any owl weak enough from near
> starvation to allow itself to be captured by an amateur like me, however
> well coached, would be impossibly stressed by the experience, I would
> think,.and likely not savable anyway, no?
>
>
>
> On Sun, 20 Jan 2019 16:14:07 -0500, H Nicolay <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > Hi Jane and all. Under the Vermont fish and wildlife website there is a
> > list of raptor rehabilitators. Myself among them are ready to help any
> owl
> > in need. Please seek advice first from a Rehabber safest way to capture
> a
> > raptor. I believe their talons exert 600 pounds of pressure per inch.
> > Helena Nicolay. North stream wildlife rescue. Monkton. Ps. Whoever snap
> > traps mice invading homes, one can always place mice on low tree
> branches
> > for owls and ravens and crows.
> >
> > On Sun, Jan 20, 2019, 4:05 PM Jane Stein <[log in to unmask] wrote:
> >
> >> This kind of snowfall is particularly hard on Barred Owls because they
> >> can't dive deep enough to catch a mouse underneath even if they can
> hear
> >> it
> >> clearly through a foot-plus of snow.  It will get worse, too, as this
> >> snow
> >> packs down on itself and gets really impenetrable.  I remember one very
> >> snowy winter that went on and on and on some years ago when there were
> >> barred owls everywhere sitting out on fenceposts and lower tree
> branches
> >> during the daylight hours, until they were so weak from hunger, they
> >> couldn't manage a pounce anyway, and they were falling off dead.
> >> Horrible
> >> to see, but what can you do?
> >>
> >>
> >> On Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:36:36 -0500, Eugenia Cooke <[log in to unmask]>
> >> wrote:
> >> > Large and beautiful barred owl surveying my yard an hour ago. Very
> rare
> >> > here! No Flickr account. I never see people sending pics on vtbird,
> >> > just
> >> > links, so won't unless advised it's okay to do so.
> >>
>