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At 5:05 a.m. I went outside to walk my dogs and heard the loud, emphatic
song of an ovenbird (FOY), singing high in a red oak while it snowed and
snowed . . . and stuck.

FYI: in May 1976 (5th and 6th), there was a snowfall in the Connecticut
River Valley. Hanover had more than five inches. Along Route 10 male
scarlet tanagers and Baltimore (northern then) orioles and assorted warbler
species stood and starved on the road shoulders. Warblers picked dried
insects out of car grills. (I don't recall in the Champlain Valley had
snow; there was no *Eye on the Sky* back then. I'm sure the Green Mountains
did.) The Montshire Museum of Science's mounted bird collection, which my
wife Linny curated back then, had nearly a dozen freeze-dried tanangers and
numerous other Neotropical migrants, all bearing labeled dates of
collection as May 6 or 7, 1976.

I haven't ever since snow in the Upper Valley on May 14.

Ted