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I started drafting this email yesterday, before Chris Rimmer’s amazing report. I know many of you have noticed the recent increase in Cape May Warblers, but the flurry of recent reports, and their frequent appearances in my backyard (its been the most abundant warbler this spring) spurred me to do some ebird digging. 

This spring they have been seen nearly twice as frequently as in the past few springs. Also it seems the peak numbers are a little bit later this year (and maybe still to come?).
https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=2015&eyr=2019&bmo=3&emo=6&r=US-VT&spp=camwar&separateYears=true <https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=2015&eyr=2019&bmo=3&emo=6&r=US-VT&spp=camwar&separateYears=true>

And there has been a steady increase in fall reports since at least 2014. 
https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=2014&eyr=2018&bmo=8&emo=11&r=US-VT&spp=camwar&separateYears=true <https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=2014&eyr=2018&bmo=8&emo=11&r=US-VT&spp=camwar&separateYears=true>

I vividly remember my first spring Cape May in May 2010, and until I started birding the Middlebury Cemeteries, I thought of them as a rare bird, especially in the spring. I’ve found at least 8 this spring and haven’t birded in a cemetery or near a blooming apple tree yet!

Also, an Orange-crowned Warbler was quite the surprise this morning, and at least the third in VT this spring! https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56479624 <https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56479624>

Happy spring!
Spencer