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We have had GMOs since the dawn of agriculture, it's called selective
breeding. Inserting genes in corn, for example, does not breed Frankenstein
corn. It's a safe technique that's helping feed the growing number of
humans on our planet, you and me and our kids included. There's a nice
informative video on this subject by Neil deGrasse Tyson:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMDhUsxom0U
Hilke Breder
Brattleboro, VT

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 4:49 PM Poleysgmavt <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that
> some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the
> orioles (and squirrels).
> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn
> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to
> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people
> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought
> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>
> Denis Poley
> Richmond, VT
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things!
> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two
> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath)
> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the
> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
> > I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She
> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge
> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She
> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore
> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
> > Score one for humans!
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >
>