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My objection to GMOS, and why I avoid them, isn’t because of fear of eating them. I agree: they’re safe to eat. But they’re not safe to grow! The most commonly used GMOs were developed to be resistant to herbicides so those chemicals can be used heavily to prepare the soil (to kill off every other plant but not the one being raised). Heavy use of herbicides is BAD: bad for the land because it allows year-after-year monocultures to be grown; bad for pollinators upon which our entire food supply relies; and bad for the farmers using the stuff. (We’ve all read about the large penalty recently levied against Monsanto for damage to a farmer who used their products and died.) 
Maeve Kim
Jericho Center

> On May 24, 2019, at 6:48 AM, hilke breder <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> We have had GMOs since the dawn of agriculture, it's called selective
> breeding. Inserting genes in corn, for example, does not breed Frankenstein
> corn. It's a safe technique that's helping feed the growing number of
> humans on our planet, you and me and our kids included. There's a nice
> informative video on this subject by Neil deGrasse Tyson:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMDhUsxom0U
> Hilke Breder
> Brattleboro, VT
> 
> On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 4:49 PM Poleysgmavt <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that
>> some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the
>> orioles (and squirrels).
>> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
>> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn
>> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to
>> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people
>> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought
>> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
>> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>> 
>> Denis Poley
>> Richmond, VT
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> 
>>> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
>> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things!
>> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two
>> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath)
>> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
>> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the
>> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
>>> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
>> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She
>> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge
>> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She
>> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore
>> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
>> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
>>> Score one for humans!
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>> 
>>