Here a few more that came in later regarding row cover/tarp weights.  Thanks to all! 

Donna Bascom

Bascom Farm

Charlestown, NH

 

We use sandbags that you can buy from Brookdale in Hollis NH ( or Rainflo or Nolts in PA). Pea gravel or soil are good fillers; one year we tried to multipurpose stones cleared from the field and they chewed the bags right up! They are about 15-20 lbs and we place them about 15 ft apart. We dont have enough sandbags and keep larger stones around to use intermittently, covers seem to slide out from underneath stones on breezy days easier than the bags.”

 

“I use old wood pellet bags which are freely available from people with pellet stoves, and I fill them from my dirt pile, about a third full”

 

“Late response, but I sew bags out of cheap black landscape fabric from the hardware store.  I made them almost like long tube socks (4" wide, 3' long), which hold down my proteknet so bugs can't sneak through. I would make them wider, shorter, and heavier if it were for tarps, though, compared to proteknet because the proteknet just really doesn't catch the wind as much--but for sealing proteknet they're awesome. I've also seen bags for sale through Dubois Agrinovations. They are out of Quebec, but ship to the US--you can choose US or Canada when you enter their website. haven't used those bags, but they sell quality stuff. I've also heard from a farmer in VT who got sick of dealing with bags for silage tarping and went to cinder blocks instead as weights. 

 

Liz”

 

“I didn't weigh in earlier, but will toss this out anyway. We reuse our potting soil bags, filling them with sand. It's a good use of something that many folks are probably throwing away this time of year. When I fill them I tend to make them into a 'log" shape and roll the bag around a few times, hoping to have them last longer in the sun, tied in two places. When my husband makes them he just fills it with roughly two gallons worth, I'm guessing, and ties it off leaving a bit at the top which makes them easy to grab. Both work and three years later they are still in use.” 

 

 

“We missed the original question, but by far the best sandbags we have found our soul by Dubois in Canada. They have handles and are supposed to last for seven years, we have had our oldestset for about that long and they are still going strong. P gravel is the ideal filler for them, but regular across stone works well. We have found this is better than sand. The bags are generally green with some sort of stripe if you were looking for them on their site.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Vermont Vegetable and Berry Growers [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Donna Doel
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2021 10:53 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Responses to weighty matters

 

Here are answers to my weighting of tarps and fabric covers.  If people have favorite materials or sources for “sand bags” please share.  Thanks!

Original Question:

 

I'm looking at working with a lot of tarping this year, along with the usual fabric and netting wrestling.   Has anyone got some good methods of making/using "sand bags" - like weight, spacing, bag fabric, filler (I've got a leftover pile of pea gravel)?  I've improvised different things but would like to hear what others do.  Will repost.

Donna Bascom

Bascom Farm 

Charlestown NH

 

 

“I recommend getting good quality held plastic or woven bags, with drawstrings, unless you have plenty of spare baling twine. Then take care of them - no throwing, just dropping, lifting and placing.

Spacing really depends on your site and how windy it is. You might need to put them at two paces/six feet if it’s very windy. You might get away with 8-12 feet. If you’re really well protected 20. It’s better to err on the conservative side, but you’ll figure that out one way or another.”  Mike

 

“In my experience half full sandbags (of sand) is fine to hold the edge of the tarp, but I wouldn't skimp on the amount of bags. We put one every 5 feet. Its certainly some work to get it set, but I worry a lot less on those windy days.”

Terry O'Brien

https://docs.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1N2zem_64hJDuwctAYJIkF-RbNEOah1YK&revid=0B_WDQO_mgGujcms2WnFMOHNEVDk1TFAzY1hIZnd0Ymp3MWxvPQ

Kingston, NH

732-757-5793

@hungry_heart_farm

 

“I have Stoney ground.  So I use stones (no sand bags).  And I’ve learned to use a lot. A softball sized stone or bigger every 2-3’.”

Sent from my iPhone

 

 

 

 

On Apr 27, 2021, at 5:33 PM, Donna Doel <[log in to unmask]> wrote:



I'm looking at working with a lot of tarping this year, along with the usual fabric and netting wrestling.   Has anyone got some good methods of making/using "sand bags" - like weight, spacing, bag fabric, filler (I've got a leftover pile of pea gravel)?  I've improvised different things but would like to hear what others do.  Will repost.

Donna Bascom

Bascom Farm 

Charlestown NH