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At  9:28 PM 5/06/93 -0900, Dean Gottehrer wrote:
>Look at local in ways other than geographical.  In a small community I may
>know more about my neighbors than about my best friends.  In a big community I
>don't even know my neighbors' names and may know more about my net friends.
>The nets help people in big communities communicate with other people who
>share similar communities of interest.  And those communities can be
>geographically based, but they can have other foundations as well.  In small
>communities, the local nets help us stay in touch while we live where we want
>to.
 
Dean,
        I like the way you discuss your concept of local.  "If you build
it, they will come" (Field of Dreams).  The common interest version of
"local" is the freedom that allows meaningful communication without
physical proximity.  This allows the building of community structure around
topics of an individual's choosing.  The community of physically separated
people, all with common interests, enhances each participant.  This is one
of the main reasons for coming together in groups:  pooling resources for
the mutual benefit of all.
 
        Computer networks are have an interesting characteristic in that
they  enable the emergence of information *without* ties to physical
distribution problems that paper has imposed.  Information can now be used
as a ubiquitous commodity that was, until recently, hampered by it's form
of representation.  This migration of information and ideas to the new
electronic medium is fascinating to me.
        As information can be used where it is needed (through computers),
it is now possible to use information more effectively.  The information
can now be used where it is needed, (almost) instantly.
        The troubles that are arising now have to do with the true
characteristics of information.  The laws and regulations we have now are
oriented toward physical accountability instead of informational.  Therein
lies the problem, it seems.
 
Cheers,
 
>-------------------------------------------------------------------------<
     Grant Bowman               Delta Sigma Phi, Technology Task Force
 
               All hardware is worthless.    --Torque Systems