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 I thought that the article was irresponsibly written  - the main
point of the article was that women in professional occupations
tended to have a higher rate of breast cancer due to delayed
childbearing - not that librarians, nuns, teachers, and nurses
experienced a higher rate of breast cancer due to their
occupation.  The study (as written and reported) apparently did not
take into account the fact that a higher percentage of women are
concentrated in those professions - librarianship, teaching, nursing,
religious servitude - than in other professional occupations, so
the actual numbers are (of course) going to be higher.
 
Sue Fawcett
Law Librarian
Texas Dept. of Human Services         [log in to unmask]
Austin, Texas
 
 
On Mon, 20 Sep 1993, Carolyn Weaver wrote:
 
> The story I saw about this was in the Seattle Times 2-3 weeks ago
> (presumably picked up from one of the wire services).  I didn't keep
> a copy, but to the best of my recollection, it stated that the
> incidence of breast cancer amoung librarians, nuns, teachers(?) and
> nurses(?) - the first two groups were specifically mentioned and I think
> the others were also included - is about 62% higher than normal.  The
> report stated that the connection is probably related to delayed
> childbearing rather than the occupations per se.
>
> Carolyn G. Weaver
> Associate Director for Administration
> Health Sciences Library
> University of Washington        e-mail:  [log in to unmask]
> SB-55                           phone:   206/543-3401
> Seattle, Wa.  98195             fax:     206/543-8066