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There have been a number of other articles this week in the print media
(Harpers', The San Francisco Cronical), claiming that the Net is
impervious to censorship.  Nevertheless, these articles offer an ironic
cover story for the continuing pressure that is actually being asserted by
the Electronic Frontier Foundation and others to impose a censorship model
in cyberspace, as I report in FINS Vol. 2, Issue No. 10, to be released
later today.  The censorship model may fail, but only with rigorous
defense of freedom of speech in cyberspace, supported by strong
instrumental structures.  vs
 
On Wed, 4 May 1994, Arthur R. McGee wrote:
 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> Date: Mon, 02 May 94 23:27:43 EDT
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Some Good Press: Gleick Article
>
> This last Sunday's _The New York Times Magazine_ (Sunday May 1, 1994) ran
> an insightful piece about the nature and evolution of cyberspace, "The
> Information Future: OUT OF CONTROL (And it's a good thing, too)."  It was
> written by James Gleick, author of numerous popular science books and
> operator of Pipeline, a new Manhattan-based Internet provider.  It
> contrasts big business' muddling, misinformed push to create the
> Information Superhighway (tm) with the Internet, which is "like a vast
> television station without programmers or a newspaper without editors --
> or rather, with millions of programmers and editors.  It's a frontier,
> befitting its origins: unruly, impolite and anarchic.  But also
> democratic."
>
> Find a copy, read it, show it around.
>
> ---
>
> For a while there, it seemed that every editorial and article I read about
> the "Information Superhighway" was by a cranky, clueless litteratuer --
> the kind last heard from when word processors began replacing typewriters
> in a big way -- who equated cyberspace with monolithic corporations,
> 500-channel cable services, videophones and the home shopping channel.
> Lately, there have been more pieces like Mr. Gleick's:  Informed,
> well-written, and appealing to thoughtful, concerned people.
>
> The tide of battle may be turning.
>
> ---
>
> Quotable Quote: "The hardest fact to grasp about the Internet and the
> I-way is this:  It isn't a thing; it isn't an entity; it isn't an
> organization.  No one owns it; no one runs it.  It is simply Everyone's
> Computer, Connected."
>
> --Stefan Jones
>