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One of the most important things you could do to help the medical education
curriculum is train doctors to have good work habits.  Please read the enclosed
file and let me know if this interests you:
Thank you for responding to my query.  The information you've
given me will be of great help in preparing my presentation for
addressing the American Association for Medical Transcription's
second annual managers and supervisors conference in Las Vegas.
 
For your information, in addition to my work as a medical
transcriptionst I teach a seminar entitled "DICTATION THERAPY FOR
DOCTORS."   The following material is the basic text of the
brochure I use when using snail mail.  If this would be of
interest to you for the doctors or medical students at your
facility, please don't hesitate to contact me.
 
===============================================================
 
 
          DICTATION THERAPY FOR DOCTORS
 
Minus a good medical transcriptionist's interpretive skills, a
malpractice suit can be lost in court.  Could an aggressive
attorney succeed in impeaching your expert medical testimony?  Or
your credibility as a witness?  Just consider these examples of
mistakes physicians have recently made while dictating routine
hospital reports:
 
     "The patient was told to continue drinking normal amounts of
     urine and come see me in the office in one week."
 
     "The patient also underwent a left third foot metatarsal
     head resection."
 
     "She was found by a boarder who lives in her home
     unconscious in the bathroom."
 
     "The patient was then treated with a split-thickness shit
     graft."
 
     "The patient is a 26-year-old mother of seven who apparently
     was in the operating room for some reason but fell asleep
     when it was discovered that she was pregnant at another
     hospital."
 
     "What am I trying to say?  I don't know what I'm trying to
     say.  You know what I'm trying to say.  Why don't you just
     put it in?"
 
No one ever tells aspiring doctors about the endless hours they
will spend dictating reports.  And yet the quality of a medical
transcriptionist's work is totally dependent on the raw material
that reaches that person's ears.
 
In order to produce a legible and coherent patient record, even
the best medical transcriptionists (MTs) struggle to untangle the
botched dictation of physicians who are overworked, exhausted
and who hate to dictate.
 
Without an alert medical transcriptionist at the keyboard, the
future care of a patient can be severely jeopardized if dictated
mistakes get passed from one report to another.
 
While most doctors are fairly conscientious about getting routine
checkups from their personal dentist, few physicians realize how
much they could benefit from a short course of
dictation therapy.
 
 
          WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP?
 
The simplest way to ensure top-quality transcription is to make
an extra effort to strengthen every physician's dictation skills.
 
Just like flossing your teeth, a little bit of preventive care
can go a long way.  Now is the time to schedule your physicians
for an hour-long course  of  "DICTATION THERAPY FOR DOCTORS"
and offer it to them as part of their continuing medical
education (CME) credits.
 
This seminar can pay for itself by increasing the productivity of
your transcriptionists. It can also provide a sorely-needed
reminder to your medical staff about the liability faced by
hospitals and physicians with regard to errors and omissions in
patient care documentation.
 
          ABOUT THE SPEAKER
 
George Heymont is co-founder of San Francisco's Alert & Oriented
Medical Transcription Services and  the prime mover behind the
resurrection of the Golden Gate Chapter of the American
Association for Medical Transcription. His writing has appeared
in American Medical News, MD, Private Practice, The Deaf
American, the Journal of the American Association for Medical
Transcription, The Braille Mirror and The Foot and Ankle Reporter
(the newsletter of the San Francisco/San Mateo Podiatric Medical
Society).
 
 
For more information about "DICTATION THERAPY FOR DOCTORS,"
contact:
 
GEORGE HEYMONT
487-B Dolores Street
San Francisco, California 94110
(415) 863-5992
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