Print

Print


On Tue, 8 Nov 1994, Jeff Clements wrote:
 
> I am interested in knowing what local > governments are doing with
regard to utilizing television as a means of > information/education on
government activities.  In Jacksonville Florida > we televise our city
council meetings via the local public television > station, and several
council members host weekly shows on the public > access cable channel.
Both are produced by employees of the stations. > > Can anyone provide
examples of cities using television in the same or > other ways?  Are
bthere cities that have their own production facilities > and personnel? >
> Can anyone provide examples of cities using television in the same or
> other ways?  Are bthere cities that have their own production facilities
> and personnel?
>
> Jeff Clements, Research Assistant
> Jacksonville FL City Council
> [log in to unmask]
 
 
     Jeff,
 
     I can't imagine a better role model than the government access
     channel in Burlington, VT, CCTV, "Town Meeting Televison."
     CCTV does gavel-to-gavel coverage of municipal government meetings
     and in-studio interviews with local government officials and others,
     such as the local chamber of commerce.   CCTV also provides forums
     and debates for all the political candidates at election time, and
     live coverage of the returns on election night.
 
     CCTV operates under contract with the local cable TV company with
     a small, incredibly dedicated and hard-working staff that recruits
     additional help from volunteers and members of the local media.
     I'm one of the latter who participates during elections.
 
     CCTV provides an invaluable service to the community by bringing
     local government and public affairs into the living rooms of
     thousands of cable subscribers.   People who don't have the time
     or inclination to attend local government meetings are kept
     informed.
 
     The beauty of it is that local government is not put in the
     position of covering itself and becoming vulnerable to conflicts
     of interest, questions of credibilty or promoting itself at the
     taxpayers' expense.
 
     Obviously, somebody pays for this--the cable subscribers.
     But CCTV's budget is only a tiny fraction of the cable company's
     local revenues.  To be sure, there is plenty of controversy over
     public access issues and uncertainty over the future as new
     technologies emerge and telecommunications law (eventually but
     inevitably) is re-written.   But I'd be willing to bet money that
     CCTV has generated enough good will to assure continued support
     from public officials, community leaders and the public at large.
 
     Incidentally, CCTV is separate from what most people probably
     think of as "public access," which operates on a different cable
     channel here and offers members of the public their own direct
     access.
 
     CCTV operates under the supervsion of an appointed board and
     a set of rules and guidelines, which would provide you with
     the details.
 
     CCTV's director is Lauren-Glenn Davitian:
 
                         [log in to unmask]
 
                         294 North Winooski Avenue
                         Burlington, VT 05401
                         802/862-3966