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>The traditional publishers are about to loose their captive audiences.  And
>alonge with with them, the advertisers will losse their captive audience.
>It will be real interesting to see how they adapt to that.
 
For what its worth, one of the main problems I see happening in the future
is one of the main problems associated with today: control of informtation
vested in the hands of the oligopolies that presently exist.  Any future
scenario that allows private ownership of access to the internet, and
information on it, will invariably lead to the same problem we now have
with the print media.  Ony a select few will be able to set the agenda for
public discussion.  Captive audiences might reappear only as captive
subscribers to an information service which generates more quantity of
information, while limiting the content and/or quality, just as we see
today with corporate news.
        Of course, that's not the party line with the new crowd in
Washington, who seem more inclined than not to allow monopolisic corporate
enterprises to be given control of even more public space - be it land in
Texas or cyberspace. What would Newtie think?