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I agree that the Net opens up wonderful opportunities for people from a wide
variety of backgrounds to become publishers. And I agree that the selective
nature of subscribing only to lists that are of interest to one, allows some
control of "junk mail."  However, I appreciate the fact that my local newspaper
selects op/ed page columnists whose views are nearly always different from mine
and although I don't read them every time, it makes me stop and think about my
own views and exactly why I disagree with the writers.  There might be a need
for a certain amount of randomness introduced into listservs and newsgroups
that will occasionally present contrary points of view if for nothing more than
to get the creative juices flowing.
 
Erika Mittag
 
From:   MOLE::"[log in to unmask]" 23-APR-1995 23:48:02.04
To:     Multiple recipients of list COMMUNET <[log in to unmask]>
CC:
Subj:   Re: Transition to Online-News
 
On Sat, 22 Apr 1995, Vigdor Schreibman - FINS wrote:
 
>         Nevertheless, Rosalind Resnick, the well regarded editor and
> publisher of Interactive Publishing Alert observed that news, "isn't
> necessarily what people want to read about in cyberspace." Expressing
> confidence in the genius of cyberspace, Resnick added, "To me, the
> incredible thing about the Net is that now the reader *is* the publisher,
                                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
> and amateurs ... are just as likely to succeed in Internet publishing as
> The New York Times. Or does the news- paper industry arrogantly believe
> that it can control content of every kind?"
>
 
This is a most important point that the 'traditional' publishers don't
(perhaps can't) recognize.  Or more specifically, that the reader CAN
be the publisher if the choose to.  However, there is any even more
fundamentally "increadible thing" about the net relevant here. The
reproduction and distribution costs of ALL publications are completely
leveled!  It costs no more to distribute a traditional news format, with
all its editorial content and controll, than it does an opinion (or
opinionated) newsletter, a tightly focused research forum, or a hobby
journal.  Now, the readers can select select content directed by their
interest, not directed by what's available as determined by the economics
of reporduction and distribution.
 
The traditional publishers are about to loose their captive audiences.  And
alonge with with them, the advertisers will losse their captive audience.
It will be real interesting to see how they adapt to that.
 
_________________________________________________________________________
:  Richard Tilmann                    [log in to unmask]           :
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