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  The attitude of many academic librarians is that it is the
responsibility of the student/professor to request bibliographic
instruction.  This entails every professor requiring research
requesting a bibliographic instruction session on resources
specific to that particular discipline.  The problem is that
most professors/instructors fail to consider BI a vital part
of the curriculum.  Thus we have students thrown down into
the center of the information highway.  Small wonder they stand
in the library looking like a deer caught in the headlights.
   Most reference desks are not staffed suffieciently to provide
one on one BI or help with computer systems.  It seems that the
library profession has forgotten that it was less than 10 years
ago when searching computerized databases comprised an entire
course of our graduate school curriculum.  Yet we expect students to
master with one one hour BI session.
   The mission of a special library is different, we are suppossed to
provide one on one reference/research assistance.  We can for questions
directly related to our institution,s needs.  Sometimes we have time
to do the work for students.
    It would help if our host institutions would provdie library
support staff to encourage the return to college by hospital
staff, but most will not, hence restrictions on photocopying,
searching, ILL.  The pity is that most colleges are not supporting their
students either.  They have understaffed reference and ILL departments
and outdated, broken photocopiers.
    The third problem is "lazy" students.  I refer to students who thi
that a return to college entails only showing up for class, they resent
having to do research, they fail to consider the formula two hours
out of class for every hour in class.  They make no effort to learn to
type, and you will find few to none of them in the library between quarter
s
trying to learn the CD-ROM indexes.  These people still refuse to see
that learning how to use, read, access the information in their field
is just as valuable as the actual course work.
    We get caught in the middle.  We know our collection is not better,
just made more relevent by a different level of service.  We are left with
ambiguous messages from administration about our mission and service
responsibilities.  And we know we are doing a lot of hand-holding
instead of forcing people to take responsibility for their own work.
   As per our institution, if the ILL is related to an issue that will
evolve into a staff workshop, policy change, or is directly clinically
relevant we will get it.  Policy states that the supervisor of requestor
must certify that ILL request is for institutional use.  This encourages
staff to aplly coursework to hospital concerns
   At all levels, college, hosptial, individual user there must be
decisions made as to how much support money, staff, resources, time
will be invested in the provision of information.  Right now it seems
to be a low priority on all fronts