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Immediate citizen support required!
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 
At last, a stunning proposal (by Apple!) for a genuine, free public level
for the NII: a dedicated lane for high speed public telecommunications
has been proposed, for shared use of the broadcast spectrum using "spread
spectrum" techniques,.  Massive Public comments by July 10, sought.=20
 
Vigdor Schreibman - FINS <[log in to unmask]>
 
 
---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 4 Jul 1995 18:42:45 -0700
From: Jim Warren <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask], FOI-L <[log in to unmask]>
Cc: [log in to unmask]
Subject: GovAccess.154-CRUCIAL!!!: Free, high-speed regional telecomm!
 
This is one of the most important public policy items I have ever posted!
 
This can be a *real* Declaration of Independence for the 21st Century.
 
This is one of the most important battles that citizens, community
organizations, educators, local government officials and newspapers (if
they plan to continue to exist beyond newsprint) will fight in this decade,
against government-granted monopolies and regulation-protected cartels!
 
I have been trying to find time to write about this ever since Dewayne
Hendricks told me about it about a month ago.  Bill Frezza's done it; done
it well; and Interactive Age has just published it. [below]
 
Folks, if we, the People, can successfully lobby-the-hell outa Congress,
the White House and the FCC - *right now*! - "mere" American citizens and
otherwise-deadmeat consumers can bypass the upcoming monopolistic regional
telecommunications and cable cartels and their for-certain gouge'em-deep
rate increases that will occur as soon as the current secret-deal
Telecommunications Deform Act passes and next year's elections are safely
behind the Washington Beltway's deal-makers.
 
IF WE ACT NOW - and persevere - we can have the economical, technological
viable option of completely bypassing local-loop telecomm monopolies of the
telcos, cable operators and other big-bucks telecomm giants.
 
FREE voice and data communications for residential, educational, business,
community, city, county, rural *and* mobile voice and data-communications.
 
ALL OF US can have FREE metropolitan-area voice, data and compressed-video
communications - point-to-point, and for that matter, point-to-multipoint
(i.e., everyone becomes a broadcaster, but only to those whom they permit
to receive!).
 
 
But we *must* act now - because the TELECOMM GIANTS *DON'T* WANT THIS!
 
ONLY massive public pressure can overcome their massive lobbying megabucks.
 
 
The idea is simple:
 
Have the FCC declare a tiny portion of what was once *understood* to be the
public's broadcast spectrum to be - in fact - PUBLIC SPECTRUM (a range of
frequencies available for free public use).  The formal petition has
ALREADY BEEN FILED with the FCC.  The rule-making PROCESS HAS ALREADY
BEGUN; public comments have already been solicited.
 
Open that public spectrum to FREE use by EVERYONE, subject to NO
restrictions at all except (1) broadcast power that will limit range to,
typically, about 15 to 30 miles, and (2) require use of a given frequency
for only a very brief time - seconds or even milliseconds (assumes use of
well-developed, nonproprietary "spread spectrum" techniques, where an
ongoing communication takes place on one frequency for tiny time, then
moves to another frequency, then another and so on; the most efficient use
and sharing of broadcast spectrum that is possible!).
 
 
24-megabits per second - that's 3 megabytes per second!
 
NO phone bills!
 
NO corporate owners!
 
NO wires - just a teeny weeny antenna. At most.
 
NO fees - just a one-time purchase of cheap home, office, car or beltloop
transcievers, and whatever you wish to plug into them ... phones, data
modems, video cameras, temperature monitors, etc.
 
NO operator licensing - just type-licensed transceivers, exactly the same
as police, cabbie and CB-band radios.
 
NO eves-droppers - since the spreading algorithms can be infinately and
dynamically varied (and communications can be further scrambled, to boot).
 
NO censorship needed - since content is *inherently* "scrambled".
 
METROPOLITAN area range (far beyond a single cell-phone site).
 
 
REAL content competition - not the fake "competition" of
government-created, government-licensed, government-protected conduit and
content corporate cartels.
 
Pollution-free, environmentally-sound, wire-free regional electronic public
parks.
 
 
WRITE AND FAX *NOW* - to the FCC *and* to your Congress-critters and the
Clinton White House that has been so busy selling the public's spectrum to
the few who can afford it.  Or ... obediently wait and watch the cartels
raise our rates.
 
 
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
 
 
What Do We Want?  Nonproprietary, Free Bandwidth!  When Do We Want It?  Now=
!
 
Date: Tue, 4 Jul 1995 15:47:10 -0700
To: [log in to unmask]
From: Bill Frezza (via RadioMail) <[log in to unmask]>
 
If you want to repost it [the following] be my guest. But if you do, please
preface it with a note that it is from the July 3rd issue of Interactive
Age Magazine and at the end add the following:
 
COPYRIGHT CMP PUBLICATIONS JULY 1995.
 
Date: Tue, 4 Jul 1995 14:14:23 -0700
To: [log in to unmask] (Jim Warren)
 
>From "Interactive Age" July 3, 1995
 
Where the I-way meets the skyway
 
By Bill Frezza     [via [log in to unmask] (Dewayne Hendricks)]
 
The visionaries at Apple Computer Inc. are at it again, pushing the
envelope of technology, regulatory policy and business development.
 
While Microsoft Corp.'s Bill Gates focuses on the here and now of elbowing
into the online business, Apple has fast-forwarded to a kinder, gentler
future where free spirits wirelessly surf the Web and the unstructured,
self-organizing chaos of the Internet is extended to the rigid disposition
of the airwaves.
 
Weaving together the politically popular themes of international
competitiveness, enhanced educational opportunities, free market solutions
for the info have-nots, health-care reform, quality leisure time and hard
core mobile computing, Apple's recent petition to the FCC for an unlicensed
"NII band" is this summer's best read. Check it out at
 
        http://www.apple.com/documents/fcc.html
 
        [Better still, use  http://www.warpspeed.com/ , explained below. --=
jim]
 
What they're asking for is simple enough: 300 megahertz of prime real
estate up at 5 gigahertz, enough to accommodate high density
24-megabit-per-second connections in a fluid mix of local and wide area
networking. This amounts to about $40 billion worth of spectrum, if you go
by the size of the checks the phone companies wrote for Personal
Communications Services (PCS) frequencies. And, oh yeah, they don't want it
for themselves. They want it made available free to all comers, subject
only to interference--reducing technical standards. No auctions, no license
fees, no regulations on what it's used for, and no airtime charges.
 
Does this renew your faith in chutzpa or what?
 
It's certainly a different model than either the newfangled auction
approach or the tired old lobbyist-take-all system. Think of it as spectrum
homesteading, a uniquely American experiment in don't-fence-me-in,
anti-industrial policy.
 
Before you scoff, remember that Apple has been down this path before. It
first petitioned the FCC for Data-PCS frequencies for nomadic computing
back in 1991. This resulted in the allocation of a juicy 20 MHz slice smack
in the middle of the aforementioned PCS bands. Unfortunately for the PC
industry, defeat was snatched from the jaws of victory when the entrenched
telephony interests shanghaied the band in pursuit of a home for cordless
PBXs. (A chagrined FCC later tossed the computer folks some crumbs at 2.4
GHz).
 
The petition proposes spectrum sharing by fixed and mobile users on a
completely ad-hoc basis. This "spectrum etiquette" is a brilliant blend of
good science and free market ingenuity. Spectrum etiquette imposes no
centralized control and assumes no traffic prioritization.
 
Rather, it is a low level media access scheme similar to the rules we
follow for private conversations at crowded cocktail parties. You can speak
French, German, or Chinese - whatever you please - as long as you exclude
bozos that stand up on chairs and give loud and long-winded speeches.
Beyond that, anything goes.
 
But beware of the lobbyist-loaded coterie that frustrated Apple's plans
last time. Flying under the WINForum banner, the telephony interests are
angling for the same spectrum with a rival petition. Their technical
approach, however, asserts the primacy of circuit-switched voice,
necessitating a hierarchical architecture with choke points and centralized
control.
 
Haven't they hogged enough bandwidth? They call their system SUPERNet. I
think SUCKERNet fits a lot better. The Europeans developing HIPERLAN didn't
buy their jive, so now they're trying to peddle it here.
 
And they may succeed unless the Washington-averse PC industry files
supporting comments before July 25.
 
        [=3D=3D=3DIMPORTANT ACTION ITEM!=3D=3D=3D]
 
        Drop a letter or postcard referencing petition RM-8653 to:
        Office of the Secretary
        Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
        Washington DC 20554
 
        or send e-mail to  [log in to unmask]  and offer your help.
 
Apple's decision to position this as the NII band is perhaps their best
hope, part of a savvy constituency shopping game. But posturing aside, if
this dream comes true what we'll really get is an entrepreneurs band. Not
the kind of fake entrepreneurs with half a billion dollar war chests, or
some bogus designated entity front organization. But real entrepreneurs
that hock their cars, quit their day jobs and go for the glory. The kind of
people that founded Apple and created the PC industry in the first place.
 
So good luck intrepid infobahn warriors. May your vision become our
reality. I can barely squirt 8 kilobits per second out of my antenna today.
With 24 mbps to horse around with and no physical connections to trace, who
knows what mischief we can cause?
 
Bill Frezza is president at Wireless Computing Associates and co-founder of
the online forum DigitaLiberty. You can reach him at [log in to unmask] .
 
 
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
 
 
Feedback with Speed that Only the Net Can Provide - COMMENT DEADLINE IS JUL=
Y 10!
 
[Dewayne Hendricks has been deeply involved in wireless datacomm for years,
and has spent several years trudging around Washington's endless
bureaucratic circles and serving on various industry committees, that
eventually got pre-empted by the telecomm giants.  He's walked the walk;
it's time for thousands of us to join him!  --jim]
 
Date: Tue, 4 Jul 1995 16:50:52 -0700
To: Bill Frezza (via RadioMail) <[log in to unmask]>
From: [log in to unmask] (Dewayne Hendricks)
Cc: [log in to unmask] (Jim Warren), [log in to unmask] (Jim Lovette)
 
At 15:47 7/4/95, Bill Frezza (via RadioMail) wrote:
>Jim,
>
>If you want to repost it be my guest. ...
 
        Again, very nice article Bill.  I pulled it off the IA website and
sent a copy to Jim Lovette of Apple ...  He called me to discuss the
story after he read it and together we have the following comments:
 
o       Jim and I would [prefer that people use] the URL for my
website instead of Apple's.  We wanted to have the petition up for public
access on the Internet at a non-Apple site ...
 
                        http://www.warpspeed.com/
 
o       Jim is preparing a lot of additional content on this issue that we
were going to post on my website in the coming weeks.  That's another
reason why we wanted the URL to be for my site so that people could have
access to this additional material.  There was/is no plan to post this new
material on the Apple site.
 
o       In your story, you refer to comments being due at the FCC by July
25th.  The correct date is the 10th.  Reply comments are due on the 25th
and there is a major procedural difference between the two dates as far as
the FCC is concerned.  Reply comments are supposed to address issues raised
by the comments that are filed.  No real harm done, but we thought we'd
mention it.
 
        My website has been hit quite a bit since I put the Apple NII
petition up.  Here is the stats that I generated today:
 
Warp Speed Imagineering World-Wide Web Access Statistics
 
Generated by: WebStat 2.3.4
Last updated: Tue Jul 4 14:09:55 1995
 
Summary for Period: Jun 12 1995 to Jul 4 1995
 
Files Transmitted During Summary Period            1742
Bytes Transmitted During Summary Period        23623110
Average Files Transmitted Daily                      75
Average Bytes Transmitted Daily                 1027092
 
Total Transfers by Client Domain
 
                             Number of    Number of    Percent of  Percent =
of
        Domain Name          Files Sent   Bytes Sent   Files Sent  Bytes Se=
nt
---------------------------  ----------  ------------  ----------  --------=
--
Adv. Proj. Research Agency            1         90008      0.06        0.38
Australia                             7        273073      0.40        1.16
Canada                                5         94073      0.29        0.40
Chile                                 6         90184      0.34        0.38
Estonia                               7         91367      0.40        0.39
Finland                               1           952      0.06        0.00
France                               13         45669      0.75        0.19
Germany                               8        127770      0.46        0.54
Hong Kong                             1          1183      0.06        0.01
Japan                                 9          9082      0.52        0.04
Netherlands                          12        275217      0.69        1.17
Network                             158       2242657      9.07        9.49
Switzerland                           8        182289      0.46        0.77
United Kingdom                       14        103712      0.80        0.44
United States of America             14        104744      0.80        0.44
US Commercial                      1024      13606872     58.78       57.60
US Educational                      189       3088826     10.85       13.08
US Government                         3          3121      0.17        0.01
US Military                          15        282155      0.86        1.19
US Organization                      14        100594      0.80        0.43
@=81                                    5         90184      0.29        0.=
38
[unresolved]                        228       2719378     13.09       11.51
 
                        ----------------------------
 
        Jim and I have no idea how many comments are going to be filed with
the FCC on this matter.  To date, we have gotten very few queries on the
issue.  Lots have people have access the petition, but there has been
no followup discussion, etc.
 
Alas, if this doesn't change and a fair number of comments are filed in
favor of this concept, then it will die an early death.
 
        Asking for 300 MHz of spectrum to be turned over to the public for
its own use, without an auction, was a pretty gutsy move on Apple's part I
believe.  It continues in the tradition of the original Data-PCS petition
they submitted to the FCC four years ago.  At that time, no one really
thought that the Commission would respond favorably to such a bold move on
the part of the computer industry.  Well, they did and the spectrum
allocation for Data-PCS is history.  Problem is, I don't think that in this
case, without major public support, lightning will strike twice in the same
place.
 
Thanks again,
-- Dewayne
 
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP ! CIS: 75210,10    AppleLink: D6547
Warp Speed Imagineering   ! Internet: [log in to unmask]
43730 Vista Del Mar       ! Packet Radio: WA8DZP @ K3MC.#NOCAL.CA.USA.NOAM
Fremont, CA 94539-3204    ! AOL: HENDRICKS
Fax: (510) 770-9854       ! WWW: http://www.warpspeed.com/
 
 
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
 
 
"Some folks have been saying recently, that the real message is not so much
content, at this point, but: 'What do we want?  BANDWIDTH!  When do we want
it?  NOW!!' 500,000 people on the Capitol steps should do it."
-- Richard Civille, Washington Director, Center for Civic Networking
nii_agenda mailing-list post, 02/23/94
 
 
 
Mo' as it Is.
 
--jim
Jim Warren, GovAccess list-owner/editor ([log in to unmask])
Advocate & columnist, MicroTimes, Government Technology, BoardWatch, etc.
345 Swett Rd., Woodside CA 94062; voice/415-851-7075; fax/<# upon request>
 
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