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Hi Debra,
        While I agree with some of you statements and, considering the line
of work I'm in, I certainly don't advocate dumping the whole thing.  Also
"stupid" isn't exactly how I view people, educated or not, however a reality
check is needed.
        Everyone learns and has skills (check out Skill Cell Theory and
Metodology), however, education is a specialized field and teaching and
deciding what to teach is a taught discipline (that's why their are
qualifications).  Also, if people want to use jobs as educational steping
stones to better themselves, why not set up a system which encourages it
(that's what I'm designing).  Where does it say, in a time when corporations
care about their employees about as far as the bottom line, that employees
shouldn't think the same way?  
        I trained some of the people which now hold senior positions at
banks.  I needed a job at one point, some of my old employees needed a job
at one point, and guess what, none of them work for any of our old students
because, they were a threat, pure and simple.
        If we are to change the real world, then we can't look at it from a
skewed perspective.  We must understand fully what we are dealing with.
This understanding takes a lot of time, effort and pain.  It's sort of like,
although it's against the law, some people are denied jobs because of their
color.  We all know that, but proving it in any given instance is a
different matter.  To solve this problem, the courts can only help so much.
I hope you agree the solutions will not be found in the courts, so, we must
take a different approach.
        A person can be illiterate and highly intelligent (I know, I was)
but, if that person can't commicate their knowledge, then how are we to know
what they have to offer.  Our solution, create another type of language
which uses a different sort of communications forum.
        Contact me if you ware interested in further discussion, I run on
way to much sometimes.
Phil 
>>Hi,
>>        Do you think you could take someone with a fifth grade grasp of
>>things and put them in charge of a corporation of major project?
>
>I believe you are equating illiteracy with stupidity, which are not the
>same.  A person who does not read at a high level can still think at an
>advanced level.
>
>>How can someone who knows only the most basic math help design a calculus
>>>course, complete with practical applications?
>
>Design, no. That would be why the teachers are important in the equation.
>Intelligently discuss what should be offered, yes.
>
>>        I agree, everyone should have input, unfortunately that means, like
>>many of our governmental institutions, they will talk and talk and talk,
>>only to end up doing nothing to improve the subject of conversation.
>>However, they will probably produce a nice simple repor t for public
>>release, outlining all the things they should do, want to do, but really
>>haven't any plan to do.
>
>So instead people should have no input or control?  I disagree.  There are
>a few people who may abuse the conversation, but that should not be allowed
>to interfere and this is certainly not a reason to dump the whole issue.
>Perhaps the reason nothing is improved is because of the lack of real focus
>on the consumer.  The parent has no power to force change nor any real
>alternative to the system.
>
>>        Instead of raising our standards higher, we have brought them down
>>to the lowest common denominator and made being intelligent, motivated and
>>driven BAD!  The best example practical example is the statement all to many
>>of us have heard "you're over qualified for the position" now what the hell
>>does that mean? My interpetation is "if you hire me, you'll be working for
>>me very soon because you're an idiot and know it"!
>
>My interpretation would be "I know you will take this job while you
>continue looking for something else, and will stay only a short time until
>something better comes along."
>
>>        Sure, I want and work towards getting communities and parents
>>involved, but like any important job, let's also provide them with a little
>>training and background before they start making decisions about some of the
>>most important issues facing our society.  One hundred people making a bad
>>decisions does not change the fact that they are bad decisions.
>
>And ten people with a single focus also make bad decisions.  An open
>process, involving people from diverse backgrounds and who have vested
>interests in the results, is appropriate.  Yes, people need information and
>background (I question the use of the word training).
>
>
>Debra Keller
>Director, Network Services
>The University of Akron
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