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I agree we should stick to hard standards.  I believe our profession has
so little respect because we work very hard to get degrees, then let
anyone and everyone without a degree be called a "librarian" and be
considered doing equal work to ours.
 
I think the outreach librarian (a professional MLS librarian) from
somewhere and the "hospital contact" is a great idea for small rural
hospitals who can't afford librarians.  The outreach librarian may advise
several small hospitals and be based in a larger hospital or maybe a
university.  With e-mail, the internet, and other communications media
this is easier now; although I believe the outreach librarian should pay
periodic visits each hospital.  That way the hospital has the benifits of
a "real" librarian with all his/her professional skills and each small
hospital doesn't have to hire a librarian if they can't afford it. The
contact person could be given basic training and do the day-to-day
activities.  They could also belong to consortiums, take CE classes,
attend meetings, and get better and better and managing the library. They
could be given a title which show respect for what they do, but still not
be considered "librarians".  Our unique skills would still be respected.
 
Nancy E. Ward, M.S.L.S.
Hawthorn Center
18471 Haggerty Rd.
Northville, MI 48167
 
810-349-3000 ex. 208    [log in to unmask]         [log in to unmask]
 
On Fri, 26 Apr 1996, Webster Library wrote:
 
> To Carol, Paul, etc. -
>
> There is a reality here, and maybe not every clinic needs or can support
> a professional librarian.  But there are special skill and special
> accepted standards for _managing_ libraries, and not every book
> collection on a shelf is a "library", even if everybody calls it that,
> or that is the original definiton of the word, starting with "biblio".
>
> One falls into jobs, but that does not give one credentials.  I nursed
> many a person, child andadult, vack to health, but that does not make me
> a nurse.  Or a physical therapist, or a councellor or a psychologist
> (that is by the way another profession that has some problems with all
> types of degrees and non-degrees but also some state regulations as to
> who can or cannot or should not "hange up a shingle").
>
> Persons who are put into jobs orpositions and want to learn should be
> supported, and cooperated with.  But from a professional point of view,
> and credentialing point of view, I still advocate stidking by hard standards
> and basic qualifications.
>
> I know of a librarian who was "promoted" by her boss from managing the
> library to doing "utilization Review" and the administrator fired her
> when she tried to explaing what she is all about.  He was giving her a
> "promotion" and a salary raise and considered her ungrateful and
> non-cooperative for objecting ...
>                                Dalia Kleinmuntz
>                                Webster Library, Evanston Hospital
>                                [log in to unmask]     (847) 570-2665
>                                                         (847) 570-2926 FAX
> ** Behold the turtle who makes progress only when he sticks his neck out **
>