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I thought medlibbers might be interested in this posting from my other
e-mail and Michigan list.  One of our local librarians discusses the
President's visit.  It went well, but the campaign/secret service tried
to do a couple strange things to her library.  She stood her ground.
 
 
---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 05 Sep 1996 09:54:39 -0400
From: NANCY WARD <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Clinton's Speech at Bacon Library -Reply
 
copying
 
>>> <[log in to unmask]> 08/29/96 11:50pm >>>
It was incredibly exciting to have the President choose to announce his
new
literacy initiative from the steps of our public library. I hope you saw a
picture of the two children with Clinton reading "The Little Engine That
Could."  It was his "education speech" on the whistle stop tour, and we
were
pleased that the selection team equated public library with education.
 
 Along with the Superintendent of Schools, I was able to greet Clinton
and
welcome him to Wyandotte and to the library.
We didn't really have a conversation, but I did thank him for being a
library
supporter and an Internet supporter.
 
He pronounced our library beautiful, and when he left he joked about
buying
some of our Friends Book Sale books which were in the room where he
stayed
until his speech.  He also signed a giant library card we made for him and
signed 10 copies (!) of his new book for the library staff.  We were
promised
a staff picture with him, but as he left they lined us up, he shook each
person's hand, and we'll be getting individual pictures.
 
The downside was that the campaign took over the library for almost a
week,
and turned everything upside down.  They wanted to remove all the
furniture
to create a press room.  I let them move everything until they tried to
dismantle the stacks and the LAN, then I stood my ground.  (They did
manage
to take my flagpole out of the ground while I was gone to Lansing.)  A
huge
stage was built over the library front steps, and they bought a new
permanent
library sign because they said ours was too high.
 
The funniest part was that after four days of lectures from the Secret
Service on security and how no unauthorized person could go near the
President, he waded into the crowd shaking hands after his speech and
was
surrounded by "unauthorized people" for 10 minutes.  He really thrived
on the
informal contact.
 
I hope we reinforced his interest in libraries, and I sure hope that "The
Little Engine that Could" is in the public domain!
 
Barbara Wallace,
Director of Bacon Memorial District Library
Wyandotte, Michigan
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