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Your reminiscing about the 86-87 La Nina season got me thinking (a rarity).
  If
I'm not mistaken (unfortunately not a rarity), that was the season of one
of the
most epic dumps ever at Jay (it could have been 85-86, but who cares?  It's
 a
great story.).  My high school used to run a five day trip to Jay during
our
March break (private school).  We would arrive on a Sunday and leave on
Friday
afternoon.  Aside from varying degrees of extreme debauchery that 30 high
schoolers of varying ages can find themselves in in rural Vermont (not to
mention the halcyon days at the old Schnehutte), it always provided for
some
damn good skiing.  As I recall, we arrived late Sunday afternoon to find a
fairly deep snow cover at the Hutte - probably 2-3 feet deep.  Surely it
would
be a great ski week with what promised to be deeper cover on the hill.

Well, we wake up the next moring and it is absolutely pouring rain - I'm
talking
Hilton Kaderli gully-wamper here.  All the snow is gone save for a few
dirty,
pathetic remnants where the roadside snowbanks used to be.  The mountain
was of
course completely obscured, but we feared the worse.  Nonetheless, we
warily
plowed into the trusty Econoline vans and proceeded to head up the access
(not
axis Dougie) road to the main parking lot and our certain disappointment.
We
started up the road and when we got to the Inglenook Lodge (what, maybe 1/4
 mile
and 100 ft. in elevation higher) the most magical thing happened - the rain
 had
turned to snow.  A sudden electricity shot through the van - Was this for
real?
As we climbed higher towards the tram base, it quickly became apparent that
 this
was no trick, no joke, no illusion.  The precipitation which had been
coming
down so fiercely in its horrid liquid state, had chosen to remain frozen at
these slightly higher elevations.  What's more, while at the Inglenook
there
wasn't even a dusting, the parking lot was already covered with about 2-3
inches.  We quickly disembarked from said Econoline and ran to the lodge to
 boot
up, strap in, and fly out.  Along the way, I found a second to ak a passing
patroler what the story was.  His words are now etched in my mind
forever,"The
rain/snow line started at mid-mountain and has been working it's way down
all
night."

"So how much is on the top half?" I counter with the unknowing innocence of
 a 15
year old virgin.

"Oh about 2-3 FEET!"

Now kids, remeber that scene in Bull Durham where Crash Davis recites to
Annie
(Susan Surandon) the things he believes in (long, slow, wet kisses, etc...)
  I
would say my reaction was a fairly similar "Oh my."

Needless to say, Jay Peak during March is not very crowded mid-week.  Me
and my
pubescent cohorts had the run of the place for the entire week.  While many
 of
the memories have somewhat faded into each other and now form a blythe
montage
whenever I daydream, some highlite reels which keep playing through my head
include and epic first descent (for me) of Green Beret where one could
launch
off the rock with no consequences, fresh tracks on Kitz through Friday,
making
first tracks up the Jet-T lift line.  Flying down Derrick Hot Shot and then
L'Intrepid at maximum warp just to reach the lift, flying way into the air
every
time on L'Intrepid and subsequently blowing the black plastic gimmick
thingee
out of my Dynastar Airflows, and finally, skiing the rest of the week with
Sctoch tape wrapped around said hole.

Memories to last a lifetime folks.  It's been 10 years since I've been to
Jay.
Regardless, it remains to this day my favorite ski area - East, West,
anywhere -
and that was before most of the glades were cut (at least the ones on the
trail
map).

Have a great summer everyone, only 120 days until the snow starts flying
again!