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Michael Bernstein wrote:

> ... the vast  majority of boarders have learned their craft either themselves or
> through
> friends...

I can honestly say that I have first-hand experience with this phenomenon.  A
couple of friends of mine started boarding together a few years ago.  Neither of
them had ever really skied much, so the snowboarding experience was their first
serious exposure to the mountains.  Their method of getting down the mountain
consisted of mostly heel-side side-slipping, stop, resume slipping etc. etc.  When
I first started boarding with one of them (I was learning to snowboard at that time
as well), he was amazed at the way I was turning back and forth in the fall line.
A few sessions later, as he was starting to get the idea of "turning" as well, he
thanked me for showing him this method for getting down trails.  Until that time,
and some of you may find this hard to believe, he basically thought that the
side-slipping approach was pretty much how you did it.  Granted they had only been
out a few times, and he would have eventually found out more information simply
through exposure, but it just goes to show you what the blind leading the blind can
do sometimes.  You have to wonder how often this sort of thing is happening out
there on the slopes.

J.Spin

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